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Cisco IOS XE Router RTR Security Technical Implementation Guide

Version 1 Release 1
2019-07-19
U_Cisco_IOS-XE_Router_RTR_STIG_V1R1_Manual-xccdf.xml
This Security Technical Implementation Guide is published as a tool to improve the security of Department of Defense (DoD) information systems. The requirements are derived from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 800-53 and related documents. Comments or proposed revisions to this document should be sent via email to the following address: disa.stig_spt@mail.mil.

Vulnerabilities (93)

The Cisco router must be configured to enforce approved authorizations for controlling the flow of information within the network based on organization-defined information flow control policies.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000010
Rule ID
SV-105993r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000018-RTR-000001
CCI
CCI-001368
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Information flow control regulates where information is allowed to travel within a network and between interconnected networks. The flow of all network traffic must be monitored and controlled so it does not introduce any unacceptable risk to the network infrastructure or data. Information flow control policies and enforcement mechanisms are commonly employed by organizations to control the flow of information between designated sources and destinations (e.g., networks, individuals, and devices) within information systems. Enforcement occurs, for example, in boundary protection devices (e.g., gateways, routers, guards, encrypted tunnels, and firewalls) that employ rule sets or establish configuration settings that restrict information system services, provide a packet-filtering capability based on header information, or provide a message-filtering capability based on message content (e.g., implementing key word searches or using document characteristics).

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure ACLs to allow or deny traffic for specific source and destination addresses as well as ports and protocols between various subnets as required. The commands used below were used to create the configuration as shown in the check content. R5(config)#ip access-list extended FILTER_SERVER_TRAFFIC R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any x101.23.0 0.0.0.255 eq 515 631 9100 R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any 10.1.24.0 0.0.0.255 eq 1433 1434 4022 R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any any R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit ospf any any R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any R5(config-ext-nacl)#exit R5(config)#interface GigabitEthernet1/1 R5(config-if)#ip access-group FILTER_SERVER_TRAFFIC in

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to verify that Access Control Lists (ACLs) are configured to allow or deny traffic for specific source and destination addresses as well as ports and protocols. For example, the configuration below will allow only printer traffic into subnet 10.1.23.0/24 and SQL traffic into subnet 10.1.24.0/24. ICMP is allowed for troubleshooting and OSPF is the routing protocol used within the network. interface GigabitEthernet1/1 description link to core ip address 10.1.12.2 255.255.255.0 ip access-group FILTER_SERVER_TRAFFIC in … … … ip access-list extended FILTER_SERVER_TRAFFIC permit tcp any 10.1.23.0 0.0.0.255 eq lpd 631 9100 permit tcp any 10.1.24.0 0.0.0.255 eq 1433 1434 4022 permit icmp any any permit ospf any any deny ip any any If the router is not configured to enforce approved authorizations for controlling the flow of information within the network based on organization-defined information flow control policies, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to implement message authentication for all control plane protocols.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000020
Rule ID
SV-105995r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000025-RTR-000020
CCI
CCI-002205
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

A rogue router could send a fictitious routing update to convince a site's perimeter router to send traffic to an incorrect or even a rogue destination. This diverted traffic could be analyzed to learn confidential information about the site's network, or used to disrupt the network's ability to communicate with other networks. This is known as a "traffic attraction attack" and is prevented by configuring neighbor router authentication for routing updates. This requirement applies to all IPv4 and IPv6 protocols that are used to exchange routing or packet forwarding information; this includes all Interior Gateway Protocols (such as OSPF, EIGRP, and IS-IS) and Exterior Gateway Protocols (such as BGP), MPLS-related protocols (such as LDP), and multicast-related protocols.

Fix Text

Configure authentication to be enabled for every protocol that affects the routing or forwarding tables. The example configuration commands below enables OSPF, EIGRP, IS-IS, and BGP authentication. BGP Example: R1(config)#router bgp nn R1(config-router)#neighbor x.x.x.x password xxxxxx EIGRP Example: R5(config)#key chain EIGRP_KEY R5(config-keychain)#key 1 R5(config-keychain-key)#key R5(config-keychain-key)#key-string xxxxx R5(config-keychain-key)#exit R5(config-keychain)#exit R5(config)#int g0/0 R5(config-if)#ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5 R5(config-if)#ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP_KEY R5(config-if)#end IS-IS Example: R5(config)#int g0/0 R5(config-if)#isis password xxxxxx OSPF Example: R5(config)#int g0/0 R5(config-if)#ip ospf authentication-key xxxxx R5(config-if)#end

Check Content

Review the router configuration. Verify that neighbor router authentication is enabled for all routing protocols. The configuration examples below depicts OSPF, EIGRP, IS-IS and BGP authentication. BGP Example: router bgp nn no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.x.x.x remote-as nn neighbor x.x.x.x password xxxxxxx EIGRP Example: key chain EIGRP_KEY key 1 key-string xxxxxxx … … … interface GigabitEthernet0/0 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5 ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP_KEY IS-IS Example: interface GigabitEthernet0/0 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 ip router isis isis password xxxxxxx OSPF Example: interface GigabitEthernet0/0 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 ip ospf authentication-key xxxxx If authentication is not enabled on all routing protocols, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to use keys with a duration not exceeding 180 days for authenticating routing protocol messages.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000030
Rule ID
SV-105997r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000025-RTR-000085
CCI
CCI-002205
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

If the keys used for routing protocol authentication are guessed, the malicious user could create havoc within the network by advertising incorrect routes and redirecting traffic. Some routing protocols allow the use of key chains for authentication. A key chain is a set of keys that is used in succession, with each having a lifetime of no more than 180 days. Changing the keys frequently reduces the risk of them eventually being guessed. Keys cannot be used during time periods for which they are not activated. If a time period occurs during which no key is activated, neighbor authentication cannot occur, and therefore routing updates will fail. Therefore, ensure that for a given key chain, key activation times overlap to avoid any period of time during which no key is activated.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure each key used for routing protocol authentication to have a lifetime of no more than 180 days as shown in the example below: R5(config)#key chain OSPF_KEY_CHAIN R5(config-keychain)#key 1 R5(config-keychain-key)#key-string xxxxxx R5(config-keychain-key)#send-lifetime 00:00:00 Jan 1 2018 23:59:59 Mar 31 2018 R5(config-keychain-key)#accept-lifetime 00:00:00 Jan 1 2018 01:05:00 Apr 1 2018 R5(config-keychain-key)#exit R5(config-keychain)#key 2 R5(config-keychain-key)#key-string yyyyyyy R5(config-keychain-key)#send-lifetime 00:00:00 Apr 1 2018 23:59:59 Jun 30 2018 R5(config-keychain-key)#accept-lifetime 23:55:00 Mar 31 2018 01:05:00 Jul 1 2018 R5(config-keychain-key)#end

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the start times for each key within the configured key chains used for routing protocol authentication as shown in the example below: key chain OSPF_KEY_CHAIN key 1 key-string xxxxxxx send-lifetime 00:00:00 Jan 1 2018 23:59:59 Mar 31 2018 accept-lifetime 00:00:00 Jan 1 2018 01:05:00 Apr 1 2018 key 2 key-string yyyyyyy send-lifetime 00:00:00 Apr 1 2018 23:59:59 Jun 30 2018 accept-lifetime 23:55:00 Mar 31 2018 01:05:00 Jul 1 2018 Note: Key chains must be configured to authenticate routing protocol messages, as it is the only way to set an expiration. If any key has a lifetime of more than 180 days, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to use encryption for routing protocol authentication.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000040
Rule ID
SV-105999r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000168-RTR-000077
CCI
CCI-000803
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

A rogue router could send a fictitious routing update to convince a site's perimeter router to send traffic to an incorrect or even a rogue destination. This diverted traffic could be analyzed to learn confidential information about the site's network or used to disrupt the network's ability to communicate with other networks. This is known as a "traffic attraction attack" and is prevented by configuring neighbor router authentication for routing updates. However, using clear-text authentication provides little benefit since an attacker can intercept traffic and view the authentication key. This would allow the attacker to use the authentication key in an attack. This requirement applies to all IPv4 and IPv6 protocols that are used to exchange routing or packet forwarding information; this includes all Interior Gateway Protocols (such as OSPF, EIGRP, and IS-IS) and Exterior Gateway Protocols (such as BGP), MPLS-related protocols (such as LDP), and multicast-related protocols.

Fix Text

Configure all routing protocol authentications to encrypt the authentication key. BGP Example: R1(config)#router bgp nn R1(config-router)#neighbor x.x.x.x password xxxxxx EIGRP Example: R2(config)#int g0/1 R2(config-if)#ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5 R2(config-if)#ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP_KEY_CHAIN IS-IS Example: R5(config)#int g0/1 R5(config-if)#isis authentication mode md5 R5(config-if)#isis authentication key-chain ISIS_KEY_CHAIN OSPF Example: R1(config)#int g1/0 R1(config-if)#ip ospf authentication message-digest R1(config-if)#ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 xxxxxx RIP Example: R2(config)#int g1/0 R2(config-if)#ip rip authentication mode md5 R2(config-if)#ip rip authentication key-chain RIP_KEY_CHAIN

Check Content

Review the router configuration. For every routing protocol that affects the routing or forwarding tables, verify that neighbor router authentication is encrypting the authentication key as shown in the examples below. BGP Example: router bgp nn no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.x.x.x remote-as nn neighbor x.x.x.x password xxxxxxx Note: BGP authentication uses MD5 EIGRP Example: interface GigabitEthernet1/0 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5 ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP_KEY_CHAIN IS-IS Example: interface GigabitEthernet1/0 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 ip router isis isis authentication mode md5 isis authentication key-chain ISIS_KEY_CHAIN OSPF Example: interface GigabitEthernet1/0 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 xxxxxx RIP Example: interface GigabitEthernet1/0 ip rip authentication mode md5 ip rip authentication key-chain RIP_KEY_CHAIN If the routing protocol is not encrypting the authentication key, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to authenticate all routing protocol messages using NIST-validated FIPS 198-1 message authentication code algorithm.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000050
Rule ID
SV-106001r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000168-RTR-000078
CCI
CCI-000803
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

A rogue router could send a fictitious routing update to convince a site's perimeter router to send traffic to an incorrect or even a rogue destination. This diverted traffic could be analyzed to learn confidential information about the site's network or used to disrupt the network's ability to communicate with other networks. This is known as a "traffic attraction attack" and is prevented by configuring neighbor router authentication for routing updates. However, using clear-text authentication provides little benefit since an attacker can intercept traffic and view the authentication key. This would allow the attacker to use the authentication key in an attack. Since MD5 is vulnerable to "birthday" attacks and may be compromised, routing protocol authentication must use FIPS 140-2 validated algorithms and modules to encrypt the authentication key. This requirement applies to all IPv4 and IPv6 protocols that are used to exchange routing or packet forwarding information; this includes all Interior Gateway Protocols (such as OSPF, EIGRP, and IS-IS) and Exterior Gateway Protocols (such as BGP), MPLS-related protocols (such as LDP), and multicast-related protocols.

Fix Text

Configure routing protocol authentication to use a NIST-validated FIPS 198-1 message authentication code algorithm as shown in the example. R5(config)#key chain OSPF_KEY_CHAIN R5(config-keychain)#key 1 R5(config-keychain-key)#key-string xxxxxx R5(config-keychain-key)#send-lifetime 00:00:00 Jan 1 2018 23:59:59 Mar 31 2018 R5(config-keychain-key)#accept-lifetime 00:00:00 Jan 1 2018 01:05:00 Apr 1 2018 R5(config-keychain-key)#cryptographic-algorithm hmac-sha-256 R5(config-keychain-key)#exit R5(config-keychain)#key 2 R5(config-keychain-key)#key-string yyyyyyy R5(config-keychain-key)#send-lifetime 00:00:00 Apr 1 2018 23:59:59 Jun 30 2018 R5(config-keychain-key)#accept-lifetime 23:55:00 Mar 31 2018 01:05:00 Jul 1 2018 R5(config-keychain-key)#cryptographic-algorithm hmac-sha-256 R5(config-keychain-key)#end R5(config)#interface GigabitEthernet0/2 R5(config-if)#ip ospf authentication key-chain OSPF_KEY_CHAIN

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify it is using a NIST-validated FIPS 198-1 message authentication code algorithm to authenticate routing protocol messages. OSPF Example: key chain OSPF_KEY_CHAIN key 1 key-string xxxxxxx send-lifetime 00:00:00 Jan 1 2018 23:59:59 Mar 31 2018 accept-lifetime 00:00:00 Jan 1 2018 01:05:00 Apr 1 2018 cryptographic-algorithm hmac-sha-256 key 2 key-string yyyyyyy send-lifetime 00:00:00 Apr 1 2018 23:59:59 Jun 30 2018 accept-lifetime 23:55:00 Mar 31 2018 01:05:00 Jul 1 2018 cryptographic-algorithm hmac-sha-256 … … … interface GigabitEthernet0/1 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 ip ospf authentication key-chain OSPF_KEY_CHAIN If a NIST-validated FIPS 198-1 message authentication code algorithm is not being used to authenticate routing protocol messages, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to have all inactive interfaces disabled.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000060
Rule ID
SV-106003r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000007
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

An inactive interface is rarely monitored or controlled and may expose a network to an undetected attack on that interface. Unauthorized personnel with access to the communication facility could gain access to a router by connecting to a configured interface that is not in use. If an interface is no longer used, the configuration must be deleted and the interface disabled. For sub-interfaces, delete sub-interfaces that are on inactive interfaces and delete sub-interfaces that are themselves inactive. If the sub-interface is no longer necessary for authorized communications, it must be deleted.

Fix Text

Disable all inactive interfaces as shown below: R4(config)#interface GigabitEthernet3 R4(config-if)#shutdown R4(config)#interface GigabitEthernet4 R4(config-if)#shutdown

Check Content

Review the router configuration and verify that inactive interfaces have been disabled as shown below: interface GigabitEthernet3 shutdown ! interface GigabitEthernet4 shutdown If an interface is not being used but is configured or enabled, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to have all non-essential capabilities disabled.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000070
Rule ID
SV-106005r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000131-RTR-000035
CCI
CCI-000381
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

A compromised router introduces risk to the entire network infrastructure, as well as data resources that are accessible via the network. The perimeter defense has no oversight or control of attacks by malicious users within the network. Preventing network breaches from within is dependent on implementing a comprehensive defense-in-depth strategy, including securing each device connected to the network. This is accomplished by following and implementing all security guidance applicable for each node type. A fundamental step in securing each router is to enable only the capabilities required for operation.

Fix Text

Disable the following services if enabled as shown in the example below: R2(config)#no boot network R2(config)#no ip boot server R2(config)#no ip bootp server R2(config)#no ip dns server R2(config)#no ip identd R2(config)#no ip finger R2(config)#no ip http server R2(config)#no ip rcmd rcp-enable R2(config)#no ip rcmd rsh-enable R2(config)#no service config R2(config)#no service finger R2(config)#no service tcp-small-servers R2(config)#no service udp-small-servers R2(config)#no service pad

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that the router does not have any unnecessary or non-secure services enabled. For example, the following commands should not be in the configuration: boot network ip boot server ip bootp server ip dns server ip identd ip finger ip http server ip rcmd rcp-enable ip rcmd rsh-enable service config service finger service tcp-small-servers service udp-small-servers service pad If any unnecessary services are enabled, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must not be configured to have any feature enabled that calls home to the vendor.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000080
Rule ID
SV-106007r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000195-RTR-000083
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Call home services will routinely send data such as configuration and diagnostic information to the vendor for routine or emergency analysis and troubleshooting. There is a risk that transmission of sensitive data sent to unauthorized persons could result in data loss or downtime due to an attack.

Fix Text

Disable the call home feature as shown below: R5(config)#no call-home

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if the call home service is enabled as shown in the example below: call-home contact-email-addr username@example.com phone-number "+1-800-555-4567" customer-id "Customer1234" contract-id "Company1234" If the call home feature is enabled, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must not be configured to have any zero-touch deployment feature enabled when connected to an operational network.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000090
Rule ID
SV-106009r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000109
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Network devices that are configured via a zero-touch deployment or auto-loading feature can have their startup configuration or image pushed to the device for installation via TFTP or Remote Copy (rcp). Loading an image or configuration file from the network is taking a security risk because the file could be intercepted by an attacker who could corrupt the file, resulting in a denial of service.

Fix Text

Disable configuration auto-loading if enabled using the following commands: R8(config)#no boot network R8(config)#no service config Disable CNS zero-touch deployment if enabled as shown in the example below: R2(config)#no cns config initial R2(config)#no cns exec R2(config)#no cns image R2(config)#no cns trusted-server config x.x.x.x R2(config)#no cns trusted-server image x.x.x.x

Check Content

Review the device configuration to determine if auto-configuration or zero-touch deployment via Cisco Networking Services (CNS) is enabled. Auto-configuration example: version 15.0 service config … … … boot-start-marker boot network tftp://x.x.x.x/R5-config boot-end-marker CNS Zero-Touch Example: cns trusted-server config x.x.x.x cns trusted-server image x.x.x.x cns config initial x.x.x.x 80 cns exec 80 cns image If a configuration auto-loading feature or zero-touch deployment feature is enabled, this is a finding. Note: Auto-configuration or zero-touch deployment features can be enabled when the router is offline for the purpose of image loading or building out the configuration. In addition, this would not be applicable to the provisioning of virtual routers via a software-defined network (SDN) orchestration system.

The Cisco router must be configured to protect against or limit the effects of denial of service (DoS) attacks by employing control plane protection.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000120
Rule ID
SV-106011r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000110
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The Route Processor (RP) is critical to all network operations because it is the component used to build all forwarding paths for the data plane via control plane processes. It is also instrumental with ongoing network management functions that keep the routers and links available for providing network services. Any disruption to the RP or the control and management planes can result in mission-critical network outages. A DoS attack targeting the RP can result in excessive CPU and memory utilization. To maintain network stability and RP security, the router must be able to handle specific control plane and management plane traffic that is destined to the RP. In the past, one method of filtering was to use ingress filters on forwarding interfaces to filter both forwarding path and receiving path traffic. However, this method does not scale well as the number of interfaces grows and the size of the ingress filters grows. Control plane policing increases the security of routers and multilayer switches by protecting the RP from unnecessary or malicious traffic. Filtering and rate limiting the traffic flow of control plane packets can be implemented to protect routers against reconnaissance and DoS attacks, allowing the control plane to maintain packet forwarding and protocol states despite an attack or heavy load on the router or multilayer switch.

Fix Text

Configure the Cisco router to protect against known types of DoS attacks on the route processor. Implementing a CoPP policy as shown in the example below is a best practice method. Step 1: Configure ACLs specific traffic types. R1(config)#ip access-list extended CoPP_CRITICAL R1(config-ext-nacl)#remark our control plane adjacencies are critical R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit ospf host x.x.x.x any R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit ospf host x.x.x.x any R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit pim host x.x.x.x any R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit pim host x.x.x.x any R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit igmp any 224.0.0.0 15.255.255.255 R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.x.x.x eq bgp host x.x.x.x R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any R1(config-ext-nacl)#exit R1(config)#ip access-list extended CoPP_IMPORTANT R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.x.x.x eq tacacs any R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp x.x.x.x 0.0.0.255 any eq 22 R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp host x.x.x.x any eq snmp R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp host x.x.x.x eq ntp any R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any R1(config-ext-nacl)#exit R1(config)#ip access-list extended CoPP_NORMAL R1(config-ext-nacl)#remark we will want to rate limit ICMP traffic R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any any echo R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any any echo-reply R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any any time-exceeded R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any any unreachable R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any R1(config-ext-nacl)#exit R1(config)#ip access-list extended CoPP_UNDESIRABLE R1(config-ext-nacl)#remark management plane traffic that should not be received R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp any any eq ntp R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp any any eq snmp R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any eq 22 R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any eq 23 R1(config-ext-nacl)#remark control plane traffic not configured on router R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit eigrp any any R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp any any eq rip R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any R1(config-ext-nacl)#exit R1(config)#ip access-list extended CoPP_DEFAULT R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any any R1(config-ext-nacl)#exit Step 2: Configure class maps referencing each of the ACLs. R1(config)#class-map match-all CoPP_CRITICAL R1(config-cmap)#match access-group name CoPP_CRITICAL R1(config-cmap)#class-map match-any CoPP_IMPORTANT R1(config-cmap)#match access-group name CoPP_IMPORTANT R1(config-cmap)#match protocol arp R1(config-cmap)#class-map match-all CoPP_NORMAL R1(config-cmap)#match access-group name CoPP_NORMAL R1(config-cmap)#class-map match-any CoPP_UNDESIRABLE R1(config-cmap)#match access-group name CoPP_UNDESIRABLE R1(config-cmap)#class-map match-all CoPP_DEFAULT R1(config-cmap)#match access-group name CoPP_DEFAULT R1(config-cmap)#exit Step 3: Configure a policy map referencing the configured class maps and apply appropriate bandwidth allowance and policing attributes. R1(config)#policy-map CONTROL_PLANE_POLICY R1(config-pmap)#class CoPP_CRITICAL R1(config-pmap-c)#police 512000 8000 conform-action transmit exceed-action transmit R1(config-pmap-c-police)#class CoPP_IMPORTANT R1(config-pmap-c)#police 256000 4000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop R1(config-pmap-c-police)#class CoPP_NORMAL R1(config-pmap-c)#police 128000 2000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop R1(config-pmap-c-police)#class CoPP_UNDESIRABLE R1(config-pmap-c)#police 8000 1000 conform-action drop exceed-action drop R1(config-pmap-c-police)#class CoPP_DEFAULT R1(config-pmap-c)#police 64000 1000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop R1(config-pmap-c-police)#exit R1(config-pmap-c)#exit R1(config-pmap)#exit Step 4: Apply the policy map to the control plane. R1(config)#control-plane R1(config-cp)#service-policy input CONTROL_PLANE_POLICY R1(config-cp)#end

Check Content

Review the Cisco router configuration to verify that it is compliant with this requirement. Step 1: Verify traffic types have been classified based on importance levels. The following is an example configuration: class-map match-all CoPP_CRITICAL match access-group name CoPP_CRITICAL class-map match-any CoPP_IMPORTANT match access-group name CoPP_IMPORTANT match protocol arp class-map match-all CoPP_NORMAL match access-group name CoPP_NORMAL class-map match-any CoPP_UNDESIRABLE match access-group name CoPP_UNDESIRABLE class-map match-all CoPP_DEFAULT match access-group name CoPP_DEFAULT Step 2: Review the ACLs referenced by the class maps to determine if the traffic is being classified appropriately. The following is an example configuration: ip access-list extended CoPP_CRITICAL remark our control plane adjacencies are critical permit ospf host [OSPF neighbor A] any permit ospf host [OSPF neighbor B] any permit pim host [PIM neighbor A] any permit pim host [PIM neighbor B] any permit pim host [RP addr] any permit igmp any 224.0.0.0 15.255.255.255 permit tcp host [BGP neighbor] eq bgp host [local BGP addr] permit tcp host [BGP neighbor] host [local BGP addr] eq bgp deny ip any any ip access-list extended CoPP_IMPORTANT permit tcp host [TACACS server] eq tacacs any permit tcp [management subnet] 0.0.0.255 any eq 22 permit udp host [SNMP manager] any eq snmp permit udp host [NTP server] eq ntp any deny ip any any ip access-list extended CoPP_NORMAL remark we will want to rate limit ICMP traffic permit icmp any any echo permit icmp any any echo-reply permit icmp any any time-exceeded permit icmp any any unreachable deny ip any any ip access-list extended CoPP_UNDESIRABLE remark other management plane traffic that should not be received permit udp any any eq ntp permit udp any any eq snmp permit tcp any any eq 22 permit tcp any any eq 23 remark other control plane traffic not configured on router permit eigrp any any permit udp any any eq rip deny ip any any ip access-list extended CoPP_DEFAULT permit ip any any Note: Explicitly defining undesirable traffic with ACL entries enables the network operator to collect statistics. Excessive ARP packets can potentially monopolize Route Processor resources, starving other important processes. Currently, ARP is the only Layer 2 protocol that can be specifically classified using the match protocol command. Step 3: Review the policy-map to determine if the traffic is being policed appropriately for each classification. The following is an example configuration: policy-map CONTROL_PLANE_POLICY class CoPP_CRITICAL police 512000 8000 conform-action transmit exceed-action transmit class CoPP_IMPORTANT police 256000 4000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop class CoPP_NORMAL police 128000 2000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop class CoPP_UNDESIRABLE police 8000 1000 conform-action drop exceed-action drop class CoPP_DEFAULT police 64000 1000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop Step 4: Verify that the CoPP policy is enabled. The following is an example configuration: control-plane service-policy input CONTROL_PLANE_POLICY Note: Control Plane Protection (CPPr) can be used to filter as well as police control plane traffic destined to the RP. CPPr is very similar to CoPP and has the ability to filter and police traffic using finer granularity by dividing the aggregate control plane into three separate categories: (1) host, (2) transit, and (3) CEF-exception. Hence, a separate policy-map could be configured for each traffic category. If the Cisco router is not configured to protect against known types of DoS attacks by employing organization-defined security safeguards, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to restrict traffic destined to itself.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000130
Rule ID
SV-106013r1_rule
Severity
Cat I
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000001
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The route processor handles traffic destined to the router—the key component used to build forwarding paths and is instrumental with all network management functions. Hence, any disruption or denial of service (DoS) attack to the route processor can result in mission critical network outages.

Fix Text

Step 1: Configure the ACL for any external interfaces as shown in the example. R1(config)#ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.11.1.1 eq bgp host x.11.1.2 R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 eq bgp R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo-reply R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host x.11.1.1 log-input R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit … … … … R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input Step 2: Configure the ACL for any external interfaces as shown in the example. R1(config)#ip access-list extended INTERNAL_ACL R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit ospf host 10.1.12.1 host 10.1.12.2 R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp 10.2.1.0 0.0.0.255 host 10.1.12.2 eq 22 R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp 10.2.1.0 0.0.0.255 host 10.1.12.2 eq tacacs R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp 10.2.1.0 0.0.0.255 host 10.1.12.2 eq snmp R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp 10.2.1.0 0.0.0.255 host 10.1.12.2 eq ntp R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 10.1.12.2 log-input R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit … … … … R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any any log-input R1(config-ext-nacl)#exit Note: best practice is to configure the ACL statements relative to traffic destined to the router first followed by ACL statements for transit traffic. Step 3: Apply the ACLs to the appropriate interface as shown in the example below: R1(config)#int g0/2 R1(config-if)#ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL in R1(config)#int g0/3 R1(config-if)#ip access-group INTERNAL_ACL in

Check Content

Review the external and internal ACLs to verify that the router is configured to only allow specific management and control plane traffic from specific sources destined to itself. Step 1: Verify ACLs has been configured as shown in the example below that matches expected control plane and management plane traffic. With the exception of Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), all other traffic destined to the router should be dropped. ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL permit tcp host x.11.1.1 eq bgp host x.11.1.2 permit tcp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 eq bgp permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo-reply deny ip any host x.11.1.1 log-input permit … … … … deny ip any any log-input ip access-list extended INTERNAL_ACL permit icmp any any permit ospf host 10.1.12.1 host 10.1.12.2 permit tcp 10.2.1.0 0.0.0.255 host 10.1.12.2 eq 22 permit tcp 10.2.1.0 0.0.0.255 host 10.1.12.2 eq tacacs permit udp 10.2.1.0 0.0.0.255 host 10.1.12.2 eq snmp permit udp 10.2.1.0 0.0.0.255 host 10.1.12.2 eq ntp deny ip any host 10.1.12.2 log-input permit … … … … deny ip any any log-input Note: For the internal ACL example, all routers within the hypothetical network (10.1.0.0/16) have been configured to use the loopback address to source all management traffic (not shown); hence, the loopbacks are the only allowable destination address for management traffic. In addition, all management traffic destined to the router must originate from the management network (10.2.1.0/24). With the exception of link-local control plane traffic and ICMP, all other traffic destined to any physical interface address will be dropped. Step 2: Verify that the ACL has been applied to the appropriate interface as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/2 ip address x.11.1.2 255.255.255.254 ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL in interface GigabitEthernet0/3 ip address 10.1.12.2 255.255.255.0 ip access-group INTERNAL_ACL in If the router is not configured to restrict traffic destined to itself, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to drop all fragmented Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) packets destined to itself.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000140
Rule ID
SV-106015r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000002
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Fragmented ICMP packets can be generated by hackers for DoS attacks such as Ping O' Death and Teardrop. It is imperative that all fragmented ICMP packets are dropped.

Fix Text

Configure the external and internal ACLs to drop all fragmented ICMP packets destined to itself as shown in the example below: R1(config)#ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny icmp any host x.11.1.2 fragments R1(config)#ip access-list extended INTERNAL_ACL R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny icmp any host 10.1.12.2 fragments Note: Ensure the above statement is before any permit statements for ICMP.

Check Content

Review the external and internal ACLs to verify that the router is configured drop all fragmented destined to itself. ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL permit tcp host x.11.1.1 eq bgp host x.11.1.2 permit tcp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 eq bgp deny icmp any host x.11.1.2 fragments permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo … … deny ip any any ! ip access-list extended INTERNAL_ACL deny icmp any host 10.1.12.2 fragments permit icmp any any Note: Ensure the statement to deny ICMP fragments is before any permit statements for ICMP. If the router is not configured to drop all fragmented ICMP packets destined to itself, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to have Gratuitous ARP disabled on all external interfaces.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000150
Rule ID
SV-106017r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000111
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

A gratuitous ARP is an ARP broadcast in which the source and destination MAC addresses are the same. It is used to inform the network about a host IP address. A spoofed gratuitous ARP message can cause network mapping information to be stored incorrectly, causing network malfunction.

Fix Text

Disable gratuitous ARP as shown in the example below: R5(config)#no ip gratuitous-arps

Check Content

Review the configuration to determine if gratuitous ARP is disabled. The following command should not be found in the router configuration: ip gratuitous-arps Note: With Cisco IOS, Gratuitous ARP is enabled and disabled globally. If gratuitous ARP is enabled on any external interface, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to have IP directed broadcast disabled on all interfaces.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000160
Rule ID
SV-106019r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000112
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

An IP directed broadcast is a datagram sent to the broadcast address of a subnet that is not directly attached to the sending machine. The directed broadcast is routed through the network as a unicast packet until it arrives at the target subnet, where it is converted into a link-layer broadcast. Because of the nature of the IP addressing architecture, only the last router in the chain, which is connected directly to the target subnet, can conclusively identify a directed broadcast. IP directed broadcasts are used in the extremely common and popular smurf, or denial of service (DoS), attacks. In a smurf attack, the attacker sends Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo requests from a falsified source address to a directed broadcast address, causing all the hosts on the target subnet to send replies to the falsified source. By sending a continuous stream of such requests, the attacker can create a much larger stream of replies, which can completely inundate the host whose address is being falsified. This service should be disabled on all interfaces when not needed to prevent smurf and DoS attacks. Directed broadcast can be enabled on internal facing interfaces to support services such as Wake-On-LAN. Case scenario may also include support for legacy applications where the content server and the clients do not support multicast. The content servers send streaming data using UDP broadcast. Used in conjunction with the IP multicast helper-map feature, broadcast data can be sent across a multicast topology. The broadcast streams are converted to multicast and vice versa at the first-hop routers and last-hop routers before entering and leaving the multicast transit area respectively. The last-hop router must convert the multicast to broadcast. Hence, this interface must be configured to forward a broadcast packet (i.e., a directed broadcast address is converted to the all nodes broadcast address).

Fix Text

Disable IP directed broadcast on all interfaces as shown in the example below: R4(config)#int g0/1 R4(config-if)#no ip directed-broadcast

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if it is compliant with this requirement. IP directed broadcast command must not be found on any interface as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/1 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 ip directed-broadcast If IP directed broadcast is not disabled on all interfaces, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to have Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) unreachable messages disabled on all external interfaces.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000170
Rule ID
SV-106021r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000113
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The ICMP supports IP traffic by relaying information about paths, routes, and network conditions. Routers automatically send ICMP messages under a wide variety of conditions. Host unreachable ICMP messages are commonly used by attackers for network mapping and diagnosis.

Fix Text

Step 1: Disable ip unreachables on all external interfaces. R4(config)#int g0/1 R4(config-if)#no ip unreachables Step 2: Disable ip unreachables on the Null0 interface if it is used to backhole packets. R4(config-if)#int null 0 R4(config-if)#no ip unreachables Alternative – DODIN Backbone: Configure the PE router to rate limit ICMP unreachable messages as shown in the example below: R4(config)#ip icmp rate-limit unreachable df 100 R4(config)#ip icmp rate-limit unreachable 100000 R4(config)#end Alternative – Non DODIN Backbone. An alternative for non-backbone networks (i.e. enclave, base, camp, etc.) is to filter messages generated by the router and silently drop ICMP Administratively Prohibited and Host Unreachable messages using the following configuration steps: Step 1: Configure ACL to include ICMP Type 3 Code 1 (Host Unreachable) and Code 13 (Administratively Prohibited) as shown in the example below: R2(config)#ip access-list ext ICMP_T3C1C13 R2(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any any host-unreachable R2(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any any administratively-prohibited R2(config-ext-nacl)#exit Step 2: Create a route map to forward these ICMP messages to the Null0 interface. R2(config)#route-map LOCAL_POLICY R2(config-route-map)#match ip address ICMP_T3C1C13 R2(config-route-map)#set interface Null0 R2(config-route-map)#exit Step 3: Configure no ip unreachables on the Null0 interface. R2(config)#int null 0 R2(config-if)#no ip unreachables R2(config-if)#exit Step 4: Apply the policy to filter messages generated by the router. R2(config)#ip local policy route-map LOCAL_POLICY R2(config)#end

Check Content

Review the configuration to verify the no ip unreachables command has been configured on all external interfaces as shown in the configuration example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/1 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 no ip unreachables If ICMP unreachable notifications are sent from any external or null0 interface, this is a finding. Alternative – DODIN Backbone: Verify that the PE router is configured to rate limit ICMP unreachable messages as shown in the example below: ip icmp rate-limit unreachable 60000 ip icmp rate-limit unreachable DF 1000 Note: In the example above, packet-too-big message (ICMP Type 3 Code 4) can be sent once every second, while all other destination unreachable messages can be sent once every minute. This will avoid disrupting Path MTU Discovery for traffic traversing the backbone while mitigating the risk of an ICMP unreachable DoS attack. IF the PE router is not configured to rate limit ICMP unreachable messages, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to have Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) mask reply messages disabled on all external interfaces.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000180
Rule ID
SV-106023r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000114
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The ICMP supports IP traffic by relaying information about paths, routes, and network conditions. Routers automatically send ICMP messages under a wide variety of conditions. Mask Reply ICMP messages are commonly used by attackers for network mapping and diagnosis.

Fix Text

Disable ip mask-reply on all external interfaces as shown below: R4(config)#int g0/1 R4(config-if)#no ip mask-reply

Check Content

Review the router configuration and verify that ip mask-reply command is not enabled on any external interfaces as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/1 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 ip mask-reply If the ip mask-reply command is configured on any external interface, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to have Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) redirect messages disabled on all external interfaces.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000190
Rule ID
SV-106025r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000115
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The ICMP supports IP traffic by relaying information about paths, routes, and network conditions. Routers automatically send ICMP messages under a wide variety of conditions. Redirect ICMP messages are commonly used by attackers for network mapping and diagnosis.

Fix Text

Disable ICMP redirects on all external interfaces as shown in the example below: R4(config)#int g0/1 R4(config-if)#no ip redirects

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that the no ip redirects command has been configured on all external interfaces as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/1 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 no ip redirects If ICMP Redirect messages are enabled on any external interfaces, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to log all packets that have been dropped at interfaces via ACL.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000200
Rule ID
SV-106027r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000078-RTR-000001
CCI
CCI-000134
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Auditing and logging are key components of any security architecture. It is essential for security personnel to know what is being done or attempted to be done, and by whom, to compile an accurate risk assessment. Auditing the actions on network devices provides a means to recreate an attack or identify a configuration mistake on the device.

Fix Text

Configure ACLs to log packets that are dropped as shown in the example below: R5(config)#ip access-list extended INGRESS_FILTER … … … R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log

Check Content

Review all ACLs used to filter traffic and verify that packets being dropped are logged as shown in the configuration below: ip access-list extended INGRESS_FILTER permit tcp any any established permit tcp host x.11.1.1 eq bgp host x.11.1.2 permit tcp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 eq bgp permit tcp any host x.11.1.5 eq www permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo permit icmp any any echo-reply … … … deny ip any any log If packets being dropped at interfaces are not logged, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to produce audit records containing information to establish where the events occurred.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000210
Rule ID
SV-106029r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000076-RTR-000001
CCI
CCI-000132
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Without establishing where events occurred, it is impossible to establish, correlate, and investigate the events leading up to an outage or attack. In order to compile an accurate risk assessment and provide forensic analysis, it is essential for security personnel to know where events occurred, such as router components, modules, device identifiers, node names, and functionality. Associating information about where the event occurred within the network provides a means of investigating an attack, recognizing resource utilization or capacity thresholds, or identifying an improperly configured router.

Fix Text

Configure the router to log events containing information to establish where the events occurred as shown in the example below: R5(config)#ip access-list extended INGRESS_FILTER … … … R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that events are logged containing information to establish where the events occurred as shown in the example below: ip access-list extended INGRESS_FILTER permit tcp any any established permit tcp host x.11.1.1 eq bgp host x.11.1.2 permit tcp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 eq bgp permit tcp any host x.11.1.5 eq www permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo permit icmp any any echo-reply … … … deny ip any any log-input Note: When the log-input parameter is configured on deny statements, the log record will contain the interface where ingress packet has been dropped. If the router is not configured to produce audit records containing information to establish to establish where the events occurred, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to produce audit records containing information to establish the source of the events.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000220
Rule ID
SV-106031r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000077-RTR-000001
CCI
CCI-000133
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Without establishing the source of the event, it is impossible to establish, correlate, and investigate the events leading up to an outage or attack. In order to compile an accurate risk assessment and provide forensic analysis, security personnel need to know the source of the event. In addition to logging where events occur within the network, the audit records must also identify sources of events such as IP addresses, processes, and node or device names.

Fix Text

Configure the router to log events containing information to establish where the events occurred as shown in the example below: R5(config)#ip access-list extended INGRESS_FILTER … … … R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that events are logged containing information to establish the source of the events as shown in the example below: ip access-list extended INGRESS_FILTER permit tcp any any established permit tcp host x.11.1.1 eq bgp host x.11.1.2 permit tcp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 eq bgp permit tcp any host x.11.1.5 eq www permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo permit icmp any any echo-reply … … … deny ip any any log-input Note: When the log-input parameter is configured on deny statements, the log record will contain the layer 2 address of the forwarding device for any packet being dropped. If the router is not configured to produce audit records containing information to establish the source of the events, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to disable the auxiliary port unless it is connected to a secured modem providing encryption and authentication.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000230
Rule ID
SV-106033r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000001
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The use of POTS lines to modems connecting to network devices provides clear text of authentication traffic over commercial circuits that could be captured and used to compromise the network. Additional war dial attacks on the device could degrade the device and the production network. Secured modem devices must be able to authenticate users and must negotiate a key exchange before full encryption takes place. The modem will provide full encryption capability (Triple DES) or stronger. The technician who manages these devices will be authenticated using a key fob and granted access to the appropriate maintenance port; thus, the technician will gain access to the managed device (router, switch, etc.). The token provides a method of strong (two-factor) user authentication. The token works in conjunction with a server to generate one-time user passwords that will change values at second intervals. The user must know a personal identification number (PIN) and possess the token to be allowed access to the device.

Fix Text

Disable the auxiliary port. R2(config)#line aux 0 R2(config-line)#no exec R2(config-line)#transport input none

Check Content

Review the configuration and verify that the auxiliary port is disabled unless a secured modem providing encryption and authentication is connected to it. line aux 0 no exec Note: transport input none is the default; hence it will not be shown in the configuration. If the auxiliary port is not disabled or is not connected to a secured modem when it is enabled, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to deny network traffic by default and allow network traffic by exception.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000240
Rule ID
SV-106035r1_rule
Severity
Cat I
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000202-RTR-000001
CCI
CCI-001109
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

A deny-all, permit-by-exception network communications traffic policy ensures that only connections that are essential and approved are allowed. This requirement applies to both inbound and outbound network communications traffic. All inbound and outbound traffic must be denied by default. Firewalls and perimeter routers should only allow traffic through that is explicitly permitted. The initial defense for the internal network is to block any traffic at the perimeter that is attempting to make a connection to a host residing on the internal network. In addition, allowing unknown or undesirable outbound traffic by the firewall or router will establish a state that will permit the return of this undesirable traffic inbound.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Step 1: Configure an inbound ACL to deny all other traffic by default as shown in the example below: R1(config)#ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any established R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.11.1.1 eq bgp host x.11.1.2 R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 eq bgp R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo-reply … … … R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input Step 2: Apply the ingress filter to all external interfaces. R1(config)#int g0/2 R1(config-if)#ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL in

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to verify that the inbound ACL applied to all external interfaces is configured to allow specific ports and protocols and deny all other traffic. Step 1: Verify that an inbound ACL is applied to all external interfaces as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/2 ip address x.11.1.2 255.255.255.254 ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL in Step 2: Review inbound ACL to verify that it is configured to deny all other traffic that is not explicitly allowed. ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL permit tcp any any established permit tcp host x.11.1.1 eq bgp host x.11.1.2 permit tcp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 eq bgp permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo-reply … … … deny ip any any log-input If the ACL is not configured to allow specific ports and protocols and deny all other traffic, this is a finding. If the ACL is not configured inbound on all external interfaces, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to enforce approved authorizations for controlling the flow of information between interconnected networks in accordance with applicable policy.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000250
Rule ID
SV-106037r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000002
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Information flow control regulates authorized information to travel within a network and between interconnected networks. Controlling the flow of network traffic is critical so it does not introduce any unacceptable risk to the network infrastructure or data. An example of a flow control restriction is blocking outside traffic claiming to be from within the organization. For most routers, internal information flow control is a product of system design.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Step 1: Configure an ACL to allow or deny traffic for specific source and destination addresses as well as ports and protocols between various subnets as required. The commands used below were used to create the configuration as shown in the check content. R1(config)#ip access-list extended FILTER_PERIMETER R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any established R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 eq bgp R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.12.1.9 eq bgp host x.12.1.10 R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 echo R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 echo-reply R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any host x.12.1.22 eq www R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input R1(config-ext-nacl)#exit Step 2: Apply the ACL inbound on all applicable interfaces. R2(config)#int g0/0 R1(config-if)#ip access-group FILTER_PERIMETER in

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that ACLs are configured to allow or deny traffic for specific source and destination addresses as well as ports and protocols. In the example below, the router is peering BGP with DISN. ICMP echo and echo-reply packets are allowed for troubleshooting connectivity. WWW traffic is permitted inbound to the NIPRNet host-facing web server (x.12.1.22). interface GigabitEthernet0/1 description Link to DISN ip address x.12.1.10 255.255.255.0 ip access-group FILTER_PERIMETER in … … … ip access-list extended FILTER_PERIMETER permit tcp any any established permit tcp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 eq bgp permit tcp host x.12.1.9 eq bgp host x.12.1.10 permit icmp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 echo permit icmp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 echo-reply permit tcp any host x.12.1.22 eq www deny ip any any log-input If the router is not configured to enforce approved authorizations for controlling the flow of information within the network based on organization-defined information flow control policies, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to only allow incoming communications from authorized sources to be routed to authorized destinations.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000260
Rule ID
SV-106039r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000364-RTR-000109
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Unrestricted traffic may contain malicious traffic that poses a threat to an enclave or to other connected networks. Additionally, unrestricted traffic may transit a network, which uses bandwidth and other resources. Traffic can be restricted directly by an access control list (ACL), which is a firewall function, or by Policy Routing. Policy Routing is a technique used to make routing decisions based on a number of different criteria other than just the destination network, including source or destination network, source or destination address, source or destination port, protocol, packet size, and packet classification. This overrides the router's normal routing procedures used to control the specific paths of network traffic. It is normally used for traffic engineering but can also be used to meet security requirements; for example, traffic that is not allowed can be routed to the Null0 or discard interface. Policy Routing can also be used to control which prefixes appear in the routing table. This requirement is intended to allow network administrators the flexibility to use whatever technique is most effective.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the router to allow only incoming communications from authorized sources to be routed to authorized destinations. R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.21 eq ntp

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to determine if the router allows only incoming communications from authorized sources to be routed to authorized destinations. The hypothetical example below allows inbound NTP from server x.1.12.9 only to host x.12.1.21. ip access-list extended FILTER_PERIMETER permit tcp any any established … … … permit udp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.21 eq ntp deny ip any any log-input If the router does not restrict incoming communications to allow only authorized sources and destinations, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to block inbound packets with source Bogon IP address prefixes.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000270
Rule ID
SV-106041r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000364-RTR-000110
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Packets with Bogon IP source addresses should never be allowed to traverse the IP core. Bogon IP networks are RFC1918 addresses or address blocks that have never been assigned by the IANA or have been reserved.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the perimeter to block inbound packets with Bogon source addresses. Step 1: Configure an ACL containing the current Bogon prefixes as shown below: R5(config)#ip access-list extended FILTER_PERIMETER R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 0.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 100.64.0.0 0.63.255.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 127.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 169.254.0.0 0.0.255.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 172.16.0.0 0.15.255.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 192.0.0.0 0.0.0.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 192.0.2.0 0.0.0.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 192.168.0.0 0.0.255.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 198.18.0.0 0.1.255.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 198.51.100.0 0.0.0.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 203.0.113.0 0.0.0.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 224.0.0.0 31.255.255.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 240.0.0.0 31.255.255.255 any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any established R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 eq bgp R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.12.1.9 eq bgp host x.12.1.10 R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 echo R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 echo-reply … … … R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#end Step 2: Apply the ACL inbound on all external interfaces. R2(config)#int g0/0 R1(config-if)#ip access-group FILTER_PERIMETER in R1(config-if)#end

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to verify that an ingress ACL applied to all external interfaces is blocking packets with Bogon source addresses. Step 1: Verify an ACL has been configured containing the current Bogon prefixes as shown in the example below: ip access-list extended FILTER_PERIMETER deny ip 0.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any log-input deny ip 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any log-input deny ip 100.64.0.0 0.63.255.255 any log-input deny ip 127.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any log-input deny ip 169.254.0.0 0.0.255.255 any log-input deny ip 172.16.0.0 0.15.255.255 any log-input deny ip 192.0.0.0 0.0.0.255 any log-input deny ip 192.0.2.0 0.0.0.255 any log-input deny ip 192.168.0.0 0.0.255.255 any log-input deny ip 198.18.0.0 0.1.255.255 any log-input deny ip 198.51.100.0 0.0.0.255 any log-input deny ip 203.0.113.0 0.0.0.255 any log-input deny ip 224.0.0.0 31.255.255.255 any log-input permit tcp any any established permit tcp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 eq bgp permit tcp host x.12.1.9 eq bgp host x.12.1.10 permit icmp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 echo permit icmp host x.12.1.9 host x.12.1.10 echo-reply … … … deny ip any any log-input Step 2: Verify that the inbound ACL applied to all external interfaces will block all traffic from Bogon source addresses. interface GigabitEthernet0/1 description Link to DISN ip address x.12.1.10 255.255.255.254 ip access-group FILTER_PERIMETER in If the router is not configured to block inbound packets with source Bogon IP address prefixes, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to protect an enclave connected to an alternate gateway by using an inbound filter that only permits packets with destination addresses within the sites address space.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000280
Rule ID
SV-106043r1_rule
Severity
Cat I
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000008
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Enclaves with alternate gateway connections must take additional steps to ensure there is no compromise on the enclave network or NIPRNet. Without verifying the destination address of traffic coming from the site's alternate gateway, the perimeter router could be routing transit data from the Internet into the NIPRNet. This could also make the perimeter router vulnerable to a denial of service (DoS) attack as well as provide a back door into the NIPRNet. The DoD enclave must ensure the ingress filter applied to external interfaces on a perimeter router connecting to an Approved Gateway is secure through filters permitting packets with a destination address belonging to the DoD enclave's address block.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the ingress ACL of the perimeter router connected to an alternate gateway to only permit packets with destination addresses of the site's NIPRNet address space or a destination address belonging to the address block assigned by the alternate gateway network service provider as shown in the example below: R5(config)#ip access-list extended FILTER_ISP R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any established R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.12.1.16 host x.12.1.17 echo R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.12.1.16 host x.12.1.17 echo-reply R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any host x.12.1.22 eq www R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any host x.12.1.23 eq www R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit 50 any host x.12.1.24 R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit 51 any host x.12.1.24 R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#end

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Step 1: Verify the interface connecting to ISP has an inbound ACL as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/2 description Link to ISP ip address x.22.1.15 255.255.255.240 ip access-group FILTER_ISP in Step 2: Verify that the ACL only allows traffic to specific destination addresses (i.e. enclave’s NIPRNet address space) as shown in the example below: ip access-list extended FILTER_ISP permit tcp any any established permit icmp host x.12.1.16 host x.12.1.17 echo permit icmp host x.12.1.16 host x.12.1.17 echo-reply permit tcp any host x.12.1.22 eq www permit tcp any host x.12.1.23 eq www permit 50 any host x.12.1.24 permit 51 any host x.12.1.24 deny ip any any log-input If the ingress ACL bound to the interface connecting to an alternate gateway permits packets with addresses other than those specified, such as destination addresses of the site's NIPRNet address space or a destination address belonging to the address block assigned by the alternate gateway network service provider, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to not be a Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) peer to an alternate gateway service provider.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000290
Rule ID
SV-106045r1_rule
Severity
Cat I
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000009
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

ISPs use BGP to share route information with other autonomous systems (i.e. other ISPs and corporate networks). If the perimeter router was configured to BGP peer with an ISP, AirNet routes could be advertised to the ISP, thereby creating a backdoor connection from the Internet to the AirNet.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Remove any BGP neighbors belonging to the alternate gateway service provider and configure a static route to forward Internet bound traffic to the alternate gateway as shown in the example below: R5(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 x.22.1.14

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration and verify that it is not BGP peering with an alternate gateway service provider. Step 1: Determine the ip address of the ISP router. interface GigabitEthernet0/2 description Link to ISP ip address x.22.1.15 255.255.255.240 Step 2: Verify that the router is not BGP peering with this router. router bgp nn no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.11.1.7 remote-as nn neighbor x.11.1.7 password xxxxxxx no auto-summary In the example above, the router is not peering with the ISP. If the router is BGP peering with an alternate gateway service provider, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to not redistribute static routes to an alternate gateway service provider into BGP or an Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) peering with the NIPRNet or to other autonomous systems.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000300
Rule ID
SV-106047r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000010
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

If the static routes to the alternate gateway are being redistributed into an Exterior Gateway Protocol or Interior Gateway Protocol to a NIPRNet gateway, this could make traffic on NIPRNet flow to that particular router and not to the Internet Access Point routers. This could not only wreak havoc with traffic flows on NIPRNet, but it could overwhelm the connection from the router to the NIPRNet gateway(s) and also cause traffic destined for outside of NIPRNet to bypass the defenses of the Internet Access Points.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the router so that static routes are not redistributed to an alternate gateway into either a BGP or any IGP peering with the NIPRNet or to any other autonomous systems. This can be done by excluding that route in the route-map as shown in the example below: Step 1: Configure a prefix list for any static routes with the alternate gateway as the next-hop address. R5(config)#ip prefix-list ISP_PREFIX permit x.x.x.0/24 Step 2: Configure a route map that will deny the state routes to the ISP. R5(config)#route-map FILTER_ISP_STATIC deny 10 R5(config-route-map)#match ip address prefix-list ISP_PREFIX R5(config-route-map)#exit R5(config)#route-map FILTER_ISP_STATIC permit 20 R5(config-route-map)#exit Step 3: Apply the route-map to the IGP and BGP redistribute static commands as shown in the EIGRP example. R5(config)#router eigrp 1 R5(config-router)#redistribute static route-map FILTER_ISP_STATIC

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Step 1: Review the IGP and BGP configurations. If there are redistribute static statements configured as shown in examples below, proceed to step 2. OSPF Example: router ospf 1 log-adjacency-changes redistribute static subnets network 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 area 0 EIGRP example: router eigrp 1 network 10.1.15.0 0.0.0.255 redistribute static RIP example: router rip version 2 redistribute static network 10.0.0.0 BGP example: router bgp nn no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes redistribute static neighbor x.11.1.7 remote-as nn neighbor x.11.1.7 password xxxxxxx no auto-summary Step 2: Review the static routes that have been configured to determine if any contain the next hop address of the alternate gateway. If the static routes to the alternate gateway are being redistributed into BGP or any IGP peering to a NIPRNet gateway or any other autonomous system, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to restrict it from accepting outbound IP packets that contain an illegitimate address in the source address field via egress filter or by enabling Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (uRPF).

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000310
Rule ID
SV-106049r1_rule
Severity
Cat I
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000026-RTR-000031
CCI
CCI-001094
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

A compromised host in an enclave can be used by a malicious platform to launch cyberattacks on third parties. This is a common practice in "botnets", which are a collection of compromised computers using malware to attack other computers or networks. DDoS attacks frequently leverage IP source address spoofing to send packets to multiple hosts that in turn will then send return traffic to the hosts with the IP addresses that were forged. This can generate significant amounts of traffic. Therefore, protection measures to counteract IP source address spoofing must be taken. When uRPF is enabled in strict mode, the packet must be received on the interface that the device would use to forward the return packet, thereby mitigating IP source address spoofing.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the router to ensure that an egress ACL or uRPF is configured on internal interfaces to restrict the router from accepting any outbound IP packet that contains an illegitimate address in the source field. The example below enables uRPF. R5(config)#int g0/1 R5(config-if)#ip verify unicast source reachable-via rx

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to verify uRPF or an egress ACL has been configured on all internal interfaces to restrict the router from accepting outbound IP packets that contain an illegitimate address in the source address field. uRPF example: interface GigabitEthernet0/1 description downstream link to LAN ip address 10.1.25.5 255.255.255.0 ip verify unicast source reachable-via rx Egress ACL example: interface GigabitEthernet0/1 description downstream link to LAN ip address 10.1.25.5 255.255.255.0 ip access-group EGRESS_FILTER in … … … ip access-list extended EGRESS_FILTER permit udp 10.1.15.0 0.0.0.255 any eq domain permit tcp 10.1.15.0 0.0.0.255 any eq ftp permit tcp 10.1.15.0 0.0.0.255 any eq ftp-data permit tcp 10.1.15.0 0.0.0.255 any eq www permit icmp 10.1.15.0 0.0.0.255 any permit icmp 10.1.15.0 0.0.0.255 any echo deny ip any any If uRPF or an egress ACL to restrict the router from accepting outbound IP packets that contain an illegitimate address in the source address field has not been configured on all internal interfaces in an enclave, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to filter traffic destined to the enclave in accordance with the guidelines contained in DoD Instruction 8551.1.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000320
Rule ID
SV-106051r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000003
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Vulnerability assessments must be reviewed by the System Administrator, and protocols must be approved by the Information Assurance (IA) staff before entering the enclave. ACLs are the first line of defense in a layered security approach. They permit authorized packets and deny unauthorized packets based on port or service type. They enhance the posture of the network by not allowing packets to reach a potential target within the security domain. The lists provided are highly susceptible ports and services that should be blocked or limited as much as possible without adversely affecting customer requirements. Auditing packets attempting to penetrate the network that are stopped by an ACL will allow network administrators to broaden their protective ring and more tightly define the scope of operation. If the perimeter is in a Deny-by-Default posture and what is allowed through the filter is in accordance with DoD Instruction 8551.1, and if the permit rule is explicitly defined with explicit ports and protocols allowed, then all requirements related to PPS being blocked would be satisfied.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the router to use an inbound ACL on all external interfaces as shown in the example below to restrict traffic in accordance with the guidelines contained in DOD Instruction 8551.1. R1(config)#ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any established R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.11.1.1 eq bgp host x.11.1.2 R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 eq bgp R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo-reply … … < must be in accordance with DoD Instruction 8551.1> … R1(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input R1(config-ext-nacl)#exit R1(config)#int g0/2 R1(config-if)#ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND in

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to verify that the ingress ACL is in accordance with DoD 8551.1. Step 1: Verify that an inbound ACL is configured on all external interfaces. interface GigabitEthernet0/2 ip address x.11.1.2 255.255.255.254 ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND in Step 2. Review the inbound ACL to verify that it is filtering traffic in accordance with DoD 8551.1. ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND permit tcp any any established permit tcp host x.11.1.1 eq bgp host x.11.1.2 permit tcp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 eq bgp permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo permit icmp host x.11.1.1 host x.11.1.2 echo-reply … … < must be in accordance with DoD Instruction 8551.1> … deny ip any any log-input If the router does not filter traffic in accordance with the guidelines contained in DoD 8551.1, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to filter ingress traffic at the external interface on an inbound direction.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000330
Rule ID
SV-106053r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000004
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Access lists are used to separate data traffic into that which it will route (permitted packets) and that which it will not route (denied packets). Secure configuration of routers makes use of access lists for restricting access to services on the router itself as well as for filtering traffic passing through the router. Inbound versus Outbound: It should be noted that some operating systems default access lists are applied to the outbound queue. The more secure solution is to apply the access list to the inbound queue for three reasons: - The router can protect itself before damage is inflicted. - The input port is still known and can be filtered upon. - It is more efficient to filter packets before routing them.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the router to use an inbound ACL on all external interfaces as shown in the example below: R1(config)#int g0/2 R1(config-if)#ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND in

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to verify that an inbound ACL is configured on all external interfaces as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/2 ip address x.11.1.2 255.255.255.254 ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND in If the router is not configured to filter traffic entering the network at all external interfaces in an inbound direction, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to filter egress traffic at the internal interface on an inbound direction.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000340
Rule ID
SV-106055r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000005
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Access lists are used to separate data traffic into that which it will route (permitted packets) and that which it will not route (denied packets). Secure configuration of routers makes use of access lists for restricting access to services on the router itself as well as for filtering traffic passing through the router. Inbound versus Outbound: It should be noted that some operating systems default access lists are applied to the outbound queue. The more secure solution is to apply the access list to the inbound queue for three reasons: - The router can protect itself before damage is inflicted. - The input port is still known and can be filtered upon. - It is more efficient to filter packets before routing them.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the router to use an inbound ACL on all internal interfaces as shown in the example below: R5(config)#int g0/2 R5(config-if)#ip access-group EGRESS_FILTER in

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to verify that the egress ACL is bound to the internal interface in an inbound direction. interface interface GigabitEthernet0/2 description downstream link to LAN ip address 10.1.25.5 255.255.255.0 ip access-group EGRESS_FILTER in If the router is not configured to filter traffic leaving the network at the internal interface in an inbound direction, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to block all packets with any IP options.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000350
Rule ID
SV-106057r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000195-RTR-000084
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Packets with IP options are not fast switched and henceforth must be punted to the router processor. Hackers who initiate denial of service (DoS) attacks on routers commonly send large streams of packets with IP options. Dropping the packets with IP options reduces the load of IP options packets on the router. The end result is a reduction in the effects of the DoS attack on the router and on downstream routers.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the router to drop all packets with IP options. R1(config)#ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL R1(config-ext-nacl)#15 deny ip any any option any-options

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to determine if it will block all packets with IP options. ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL permit tcp any any established deny ip any any option any-options permit … … … … deny ip any any log-input If the router is not configured to drop all packets with IP options, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to have Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) disabled on all external interfaces.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000360
Rule ID
SV-106059r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000364-RTR-000111
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

LLDP is a neighbor discovery protocol used to advertise device capabilities, configuration information, and device identity. LLDP is media-and-protocol-independent as it runs over layer 2; therefore, two network nodes that support different layer 3 protocols can still learn about each other. Allowing LLDP messages to reach external network nodes provides an attacker a method to obtain information of the network infrastructure that can be useful to plan an attack.

Fix Text

Disable LLDP transmit on all external interfaces as shown in the example below: R5(config)#int g0/1 R5(config-if)#no lldp transmit

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Step 1: Verify LLDP is not enabled globally via the command. lldp run By default LLDP is not enabled globally. If LLDP is enabled, proceed to step 2. Step 2: Verify LLDP is not enabled on any external interface as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/1 ip address x.1.12.1 255.255.255.252 no lldp transmit Note: LLDP is enabled by default on all interfaces once it is enabled globally; hence the command "lldp transmit" will not be visible on the interface configuration. If LLDP transmit is enabled on any external interface, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to have Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) disabled on all external interfaces.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000370
Rule ID
SV-106061r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000364-RTR-000111
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

CDP is a Cisco proprietary neighbor discovery protocol used to advertise device capabilities, configuration information, and device identity. CDP is media-and-protocol-independent as it runs over layer 2; therefore, two network nodes that support different layer 3 protocols can still learn about each other. Allowing CDP messages to reach external network nodes provides an attacker a method to obtain information of the network infrastructure that can be useful to plan an attack.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Disable CDP on all external interfaces via no cdp enable command or disable CDP globally via no cdp run command.

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Step 1: Verify if CDP is enabled globally as shown below: cdp run By default, CDP is not enabled globally or on any interface. If CDP is enabled globally, proceed to step 2. Step 2: Verify CDP is not enabled on any external interface as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet2 ip address z.1.24.4 255.255.255.252 … … … cdp enable If CDP is enabled on any external interface, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to have Proxy ARP disabled on all external interfaces.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000380
Rule ID
SV-106063r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000364-RTR-000112
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

When Proxy ARP is enabled on a router, it allows that router to extend the network (at Layer 2) across multiple interfaces (LAN segments). Because proxy ARP allows hosts from different LAN segments to look like they are on the same segment, proxy ARP is only safe when used between trusted LAN segments. Attackers can leverage the trusting nature of proxy ARP by spoofing a trusted host and then intercepting packets. Proxy ARP should always be disabled on router interfaces that do not require it, unless the router is being used as a LAN bridge.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Disable Proxy ARP on all external interfaces as shown in the example below: R2(config)#int g0/1 R2(config-if)#no ip proxy-arp

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to determine if IP Proxy ARP is disabled on all external interfaces as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/1 description link to DISN ip address x.1.12.2 255.255.255.252 no ip proxy-arp Note: By default Proxy ARP is enabled on all interfaces; hence, if enabled, it will not be shown in the configuration. If IP Proxy ARP is enabled on any external interface, this is a finding.

The Cisco perimeter router must be configured to block all outbound management traffic.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000390
Rule ID
SV-106065r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000364-RTR-000113
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

For in-band management, the management network must have its own subnet in order to enforce control and access boundaries provided by Layer 3 network nodes, such as routers and firewalls. Management traffic between the managed network elements and the management network is routed via the same links and nodes as that used for production or operational traffic. Safeguards must be implemented to ensure that the management traffic does not leak past the perimeter of the managed network.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the perimeter router of the managed network with an outbound ACL on the egress interface to block all management traffic. Step 1: Configure an ACL to block egress management traffic. R5(config)#ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL_OUTBOUND R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny tcp any any eq tacacs log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny tcp any any eq 22 log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny udp any any eq snmp log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny udp any any eq snmptrap log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny udp any any eq syslog log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any eq www R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#exit Note: Permit commands would be configured to allow applicable outbound traffic. The example above is allowing web traffic. Step 2: Configure the external interfaces with the outbound ACL. R1(config)#int g0/2 R1(config-if)#ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL_OUTBOUND out

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. The perimeter router of the managed network must be configured with an outbound ACL on the egress interface to block all management traffic as shown in the example below: Step 1: Verify that all external interfaces has been configured with an outbound ACL as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/2 description link to DISN ip address x.11.1.2 255.255.255.254 ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL_OUTBOUND out Step 2: Verify that the outbound ACL discards management traffic as shown in the example below: ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL_OUTBOUND deny tcp any any eq tacacs log-input deny tcp any any eq 22 log-input deny udp any any eq snmp log-input deny udp any any eq snmptrap log-input deny udp any any eq syslog log-input permit tcp any any eq www log-input deny ip any any log-input If management traffic is not blocked at the perimeter, this is a finding.

The Cisco out-of-band management (OOBM) gateway router must be configured to transport management traffic to the Network Operations Center (NOC) via dedicated circuit, MPLS/VPN service, or IPsec tunnel.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000400
Rule ID
SV-106067r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000009
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Using dedicated paths, the OOBM backbone connects the OOBM gateway routers located at the edge of the managed network and at the NOC. Dedicated links can be deployed using provisioned circuits or MPLS Layer 2 and Layer 3 VPN services or implementing a secured path with gateway-to-gateway IPsec tunnels. The tunnel mode ensures that the management traffic will be logically separated from any other traffic traversing the same path.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Ensure that a dedicated circuit, MPLS/VPN service, or IPsec tunnel is deployed to transport management traffic between the managed network and the NOC. If an IPsec tunnel is to be used, the steps below can be used as a guideline. Step 1: Configure the ACL for the management network as the destination. This ACL will be defined in the crypto as the interesting traffic to be forwarded into the IPsec tunnel. R4(config)#ip access-list extended MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 R4(config-ext-nacl)#exit Step 2: Create an ISAKMP policy for Phase 1 negotiations. R4(config)#crypto isakmp policy 10 R4(config-isakmp)#hash sha256 R4(config-isakmp)#authentication pre-share R4(config-isakmp)#exit Step 3: Specify the pre-shared key and the remote peer address. R4(config)#crypto isakmp key 0 xxxxxx address x.1.12.1 Note: Digital certificates can be utilized as an alternative. Step 4: Create the IPSec transform set for the data encryption. R4(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set TRANS_SET ah-sha256-hmac esp-aes R4(cfg-crypto-trans)#mode tunnel R4(cfg-crypto-trans)#exit Step 5: Create the crypto map. R4(config)#crypto map IPSEC_MGMT_MAP 10 ipsec-isakmp R4(config-crypto-map)#set peer x.1.12.1 R4(config-crypto-map)#match address MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL R4(config-crypto-map)#set transform-set TRANS_SET R4(config-crypto-map)#end Step 6: Apply the crypto map to the external interface. R4(config)#int g0/2 R4(config-if)#crypto map IPSEC_MGMT_MAP

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the network topology diagram to determine connectivity between the managed network and the NOC. Review the OOBM gateway router configuration to validate the path and interface that the management traffic traverses. If an IPsec tunnel is used to transport the management traffic between the NOC and the managed network, review the configuration following the steps below. Step 1: Note the crypto map applied to the external interface. interface interface GigabitEthernet0/2 description link to DISN ip address x.1.24.4 255.255.255.0 crypto map IPSEC_MGMT_MAP Step 2: Review the ISAKMP policy for Phase 1 negotiations and Phase 2 policy for data encryption. crypto isakmp policy 10 authentication pre-share hash sha256 crypto isakmp key xxxxxx address x.1.12.1 ! ! crypto ipsec transform-set TRANS_SET ah-sha256-hmac esp-aes Step 3: Review the crypto map that was bound to the external interface and note the ACL defined that identifies the interesting traffic for the IPsec tunnel. crypto map IPSEC_MGMT_MAP 10 ipsec-isakmp set peer x.1.12.1 set transform-set TRANS_SET match address MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL Step 4: Review the ACL defined in the crypto map and verify that the destination is the management network. ip access-list extended MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL permit ip 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 Note: The management network is this example is 10.22.2.0/24 If management traffic is not transported between the managed network and the NOC via dedicated circuit, MPLS/VPN service, or IPsec tunnel, this is a finding.

The Cisco out-of-band management (OOBM) gateway router must be configured to forward only authorized management traffic to the Network Operations Center (NOC).

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000410
Rule ID
SV-106069r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000010
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The OOBM network is an IP network used exclusively for the transport of OAM&P data from the network being managed to the OSS components located at the NOC. Its design provides connectivity to each managed network device, enabling network management traffic to flow between the managed network elements and the NOC. This allows the use of paths separate from those used by the managed network.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure ACLs to permit only authorized management traffic into IPsec tunnels or the OOBM interface used for forwarding management data as shown in the examples below: OOBM Link: R4(config)#ip access-list extended MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq tacacs R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq 22 R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq snmp R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq snmp-trap R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq syslog R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.22.0 0.0.0.255 echo R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.22.0 0.0.0.255 echo-reply R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input R4(config-ext-nacl)#exit IPsec Tunnel: R4(config)#ip access-list extended MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq tacacs R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq 22 R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq snmp R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq snmp-trap R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq syslog R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 22.22.22.0 0.0.0.255 R4(config-ext-nacl)#exit

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the network topology diagram to determine connectivity between the managed network and the NOC. Review the OOBM gateway router configuration to validate the path that the management traffic traverses. Verify that only management traffic is forwarded through the OOBM interface or IPsec tunnel. If an OOBM link is used, verify that the only authorized management traffic is transported to the NOC by reviewing the outbound ACL applied to the OOBM interface as shown in the example below: Step 1: Note the outbound ACL applied to the OOBM interface. interface GigabitEthernet0/2 description OOB link to NOC ip address 10.11.1.8 255.255.255.0 ip access-group MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL out Step 2: Review the outbound ACL and verify only management traffic is forwarded to the NOC. ip access-list extended MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL permit tcp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq tacacs permit tcp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq 22 permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq snmp permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq snmp-trap permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq syslog permit icmp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.22.0 0.0.0.255 deny ip any any log-input If an IPSec tunnel is used, verify that the only authorized management traffic is transported to the NOC. Step 1: Note the crypto map applied to the external interface. interface interface GigabitEthernet0/2 description link to DISN ip address x.1.24.4 255.255.255.0 crypto map IPSEC_MGMT_MAP Step 2: Review the crypto map that was bound to the external interface and note the ACL defined that identifies the interesting traffic for the IPsec tunnel. crypto map IPSEC_MGMT_MAP 10 ipsec-isakmp set peer x.1.12.1 set transform-set TRANS_SET match address MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL Step 3: Review the ACL defined in the crypto map and verify only management traffic is forwarded to the NOC. ip access-list extended MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL permit tcp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq tacacs permit tcp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq 22 permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq snmp permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq snmp-trap permit udp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 eq syslog permit icmp 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.22.0 0.0.0.255 Note: ICMP is permitted for troubleshooting purposes. The IPSec SA can only identify interesting traffic via address, protocol, and port; hence, the ICMP traffic cannot be qualified via type attribute. If traffic other than authorized management traffic is permitted through the OOBM interface or IPsec tunnel, this is a finding.

The Cisco out-of-band management (OOBM) gateway router must be configured to have separate Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) instances for the managed network and management network.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000420
Rule ID
SV-106071r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000011
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

If the gateway router is not a dedicated device for the OOBM network, implementation of several safeguards for containment of management and production traffic boundaries must occur. Since the managed and management network are separate routing domains, configuration of separate IGP routing instances is critical on the router to segregate traffic from each network.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the router to have a separate IGP instance for the management network as shown in the example below: R3(config)#router ospf 1 vrf MGMT R3(config-router)#network 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 area 0 R3(config-router)#exit R3(config)#router ospf 2 vrf PROD R3(config-router)#network 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 area 0 R3(config-router)#end

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Verify that the OOBM interface is an adjacency in the IGP domain for the management network via separate VRF as shown in the example below: router ospf 1 vrf MGMT log-adjacency-changes network 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 area 0 ! router ospf 2 vrf PROD log-adjacency-changes network 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 area 0 If the router is not configured to have separate IGP instances for the managed network and management network, this is a finding.

The Cisco out-of-band management (OOBM) gateway router must be configured to not redistribute routes between the management network routing domain and the managed network routing domain.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000430
Rule ID
SV-106073r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000012
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

If the gateway router is not a dedicated device for the OOBM network, several safeguards must be implemented for containment of management and production traffic boundaries; otherwise, it is possible that management traffic will not be separated from production traffic. Since the managed network and the management network are separate routing domains, separate Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) routing instances must be configured on the router, one for the managed network and one for the OOBM network. In addition, the routes from the two domains must not be redistributed to each other.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Remove the configuration that imports routes from the managed network into the management network or vice versa as shown in the example below: R1(config)#ip vrf MGMT R1(config-vrf)#no route-target import 8:8

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Verify the IGP instance used for the managed network does not redistribute routes into the IGP instance used for the management network, and vice versa. The example below imports OSPF routes from the production route table (VRF PROD) into the management route table (VRF MGMT) using BGP. ip vrf MGMT rd 4:4 route-target export 4:4 route-target import 4:4 route-target import 8:8 ! ip vrf PROD rd 8:8 route-target import 8:8 route-target export 8:8 … … … router ospf 1 vrf MGMT log-adjacency-changes redistribute bgp 64512 subnets network 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 area 0 ! router ospf 2 vrf PROD log-adjacency-changes network 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 area 0 ! router bgp 64512 no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes no auto-summary ! address-family ipv4 vrf MGMT no synchronization redistribute ospf 1 vrf MGMT exit-address-family ! address-family ipv4 vrf PROD no synchronization redistribute ospf 2 vrf PROD exit-address-family If the IGP instance used for the managed network redistributes routes into the IGP instance used for the management network, or vice versa, this is a finding.

The Cisco out-of-band management (OOBM) gateway router must be configured to block any traffic destined to itself that is not sourced from the OOBM network or the Network Operations Center (NOC).

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000440
Rule ID
SV-106075r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000011
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

If the gateway router is not a dedicated device for the OOBM network, several safeguards must be implemented for containment of management and production traffic boundaries. It is imperative that hosts from the managed network are not able to access the OOBM gateway router.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. It is only applicable if the OOBM gateway router is not a dedicated device to the OOBM backbone. Step 1: Configure the ACL to only allow traffic to the route processor from the OOBM backbone and the NOC. R4(config)#ip access-list extended TRAFFIC_FROM_NOC R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.11.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.11.1.8 R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.12.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.11.1.8 R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.11.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.13.1.1 R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.12.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.13.1.1 R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 10.11.1.8 log-input R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 10.13.1.1 log-input R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.11.1.0 0.0.0.255 10.13.1.0 0.0.0.255 R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.12.1.0 0.0.0.255 10.13.1.0 0.0.0.255 R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input Step 2: Configure the ACL to only allow traffic to the route processor from the OOBM LAN. R4(config)#ip access-list extended TRAFFIC_TO_NOC R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.13.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.13.1.1 R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.13.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.11.1.8 R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 10.13.1.1 log-input R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 10.11.1.8 log-input R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.13.1.0 0.255.255.255 10.11.1.0 0.0.0.255 R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.13.1.0 0.255.255.255 10.12.1.0 0.0.0.255 R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input R4(config-ext-nacl)#exit Step 3: Apply the ACLs configured above to the appropriate OOBM interfaces as shown in the example below: R4(config)#int g0/2 R4(config-if)#ip access-group TRAFFIC_FROM_NOC in R4(config)#int g0/3 R4(config-if)#ip access-group TRAFFIC_TO_NOC in R4(config-if)#end

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. It is only applicable if the OOBM gateway router is not a dedicated device to the OOBM backbone. Verify that traffic destined to itself is only sourced by the OOBM or the NOC. In the example below, the OOBM backbone network is 10.11.1.0/24, the NOC address spaces is 10.12.1.0/24, and the OOBM LAN address space at remote site connecting to the managed network is 10.13.1.0/24. Step 1: Note the inbound ACL applied to the OOBM interfaces. interface GigabitEthernet0/2 description OOB link to NOC ip address 10.11.1.8 255.255.255.0 ip access-group TRAFFIC_FROM_NOC in ! interface GigabitEthernet0/3 description link to OOBM LAN access switch ip address 10.13.1.1 255.255.255.0 ip access-group TRAFFIC_TO_NOC in If the ACL is not configured to only allow traffic to the route processor from the OOBM backbone and the NOC, this is a finding. Step 2: Review the inbound ACL bound to any OOB interface connecting to the OOBM backbone and verify traffic destined to itself is only from the OOBM or NOC address space. ip access-list extended TRAFFIC_FROM_NOC permit ip 10.11.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.11.1.8 permit ip 10.12.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.11.1.8 permit ip 10.11.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.13.1.1 permit ip 10.12.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.13.1.1 deny ip any host 10.11.1.8 log-input deny ip any host 10.13.1.1 log-input permit ip 10.11.1.0 0.0.0.255 10.13.1.0 0.0.0.255 permit ip 10.12.1.0 0.0.0.255 10.13.1.0 0.0.0.255 deny ip any any log-input Step 3: Review the inbound ACL bound to any OOBM LAN interfaces and verify traffic destined to itself is from the OOBM LAN address space. ip access-list extended TRAFFIC_TO_NOC permit ip 10.13.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.13.1.1 permit ip 10.13.1.0 0.255.255.255 host 10.11.1.8 deny ip any host 10.13.1.1 log-input deny ip any host 10.11.1.8 log-input permit ip 10.13.1.0 0.255.255.255 10.11.1.0 0.0.0.255 permit ip 10.13.1.0 0.255.255.255 10.12.1.0 0.0.0.255 deny ip any any log-input If the ACL is not configured to only allow traffic to the route processor from the OOBM LAN, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to only permit management traffic that ingresses and egresses the out-of-band management (OOBM) interface.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000450
Rule ID
SV-106077r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000012
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The OOBM access switch will connect to the management interface of the managed network elements. The management interface can be a true OOBM interface or a standard interface functioning as the management interface. In either case, the management interface of the managed network element will be directly connected to the OOBM network. An OOBM interface does not forward transit traffic, thereby providing complete separation of production and management traffic. Since all management traffic is immediately forwarded into the management network, it is not exposed to possible tampering. The separation also ensures that congestion or failures in the managed network do not affect the management of the device. If the device does not have an OOBM port, the interface functioning as the management interface must be configured so that management traffic does not leak into the managed network and that production traffic does not leak into the management network.

Fix Text

If the management interface is not a dedicated OOBM interface, it must be configured with both an ingress and egress ACL. Step 1: Configure an ingress ACL a shown in the example below: R5(config)#ip access-list extended INGRESS_MANAGEMENT_ACL R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any host 10.11.1.22 eq tacacs R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any host 10.11.1.22 eq 22 R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp any host 10.11.1.22 eq snmp R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp any host 10.11.1.22 eq snmptrap R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp any host 10.11.1.22 eq ntp R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any host 10.11.1.22 R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#exit Step 2: Configure an egress ACL a shown in the example below: R5(config)#ip access-list extended EGRESS_MANAGEMENT_ACL R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log-input R5(config-ext-nacl)#exit Step 3: Apply the ACLs to the OOBM interfaces. R4(config)#int g0/7 R4(config-if)#ip access-group INGRESS_MANAGEMENT_ACL in R4(config-if)#ip access-group EGRESS_MANAGEMENT_ACL out

Check Content

This requirement is only applicable where management access to the router is via an OOBM interface which is not a true OOBM interface. Step 1: Verify that the managed interface has an inbound and outbound ACL configured. interface GigabitEthernet0/7 description link to OOBM access switch ip address 10.11.1.22 255.255.255.0 ip access-group INGRESS_MANAGEMENT_ACL in ip access-group EGRESS_MANAGEMENT_ACL out Step 2: Verify that the ingress ACL only allows management and ICMP traffic. ip access-list extended INGRESS_MANAGEMENT_ACL permit tcp any host 10.11.1.22 eq tacacs permit tcp any host 10.11.1.22 eq 22 permit udp any host 10.11.1.22 eq snmp permit udp any host 10.11.1.22 eq snmptrap permit udp any host 10.11.1.22 eq ntp permit icmp any host 10.11.1.22 deny ip any any log-input Step 3: Verify that the egress ACL blocks any transit traffic. ip access-list extended EGRESS_MANAGEMENT_ACL deny ip any any log-input Note: On Cisco routers, local generated packets are not inspected by outgoing interface access-lists. Hence, the above configuration would simply drop any packets not generated by the router; hence, blocking any transit traffic. If the router does not restrict traffic that ingresses and egresses the management interface, this is a finding.

The Cisco router providing connectivity to the Network Operations Center (NOC) must be configured to forward all in-band management traffic via an IPsec tunnel.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000460
Rule ID
SV-106079r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000013
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

When the production network is managed in-band, the management network could be housed at a NOC that is located remotely at single or multiple interconnected sites. NOC interconnectivity, as well as connectivity between the NOC and the managed network, must be enabled using IPsec tunnels to provide the separation and integrity of the managed traffic.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Ensure that all traffic from the managed network to the management network is secured via IPsec tunnel as shown in the configuration examples below. Step 1: Configure the ACL for the management network as the destination. This ACL will be defined in the crypto as the interesting traffic to be forwarded into the IPsec tunnel. R4(config)#ip access-list extended MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 R4(config-ext-nacl)#exit Step 2: Create an ISAKMP policy for Phase 1 negotiations. R4(config)#crypto isakmp policy 10 R4(config-isakmp)#hash sha256 R4(config-isakmp)#authentication pre-share R4(config-isakmp)#exit Step 3: Specify the pre-shared key and the remote peer address. R4(config)#crypto isakmp key 0 xxxxxx address 10.1.12.1 Note: Digital certificates can be utilized as an alternative. Step 4: Create the Phase 2 policy for the data encryption. R4(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set TRANS_SET ah-sha256-hmac esp-aes R4(cfg-crypto-trans)#mode tunnel R4(cfg-crypto-trans)#exit Step 5: Create the crypto map. R4(config)#crypto map IPSEC_MGMT_MAP 10 ipsec-isakmp R4(config-crypto-map)#set peer 10.1.12.1 R4(config-crypto-map)#match address MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL R4(config-crypto-map)#set transform-set TRANS_SET R4(config-crypto-map)#end Step 6: Apply the crypto map to the external interface. R4(config)#int g0/2 R4(config-if)#crypto map IPSEC_MGMT_MAP

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Verify that all traffic from the managed network to the management network or NOC and vice-versa is secured via IPsec tunnel. Step 1: Note the crypto map applied to the external interface. interface GigabitEthernet0/2 description link to DISN ip address x.1.24.4 255.255.255.0 crypto map IPSEC_MGMT_MAP Step 2: Review the ISAKMP policy for Phase 1 negotiations and Phase 2 policy for data encryption. crypto isakmp policy 10 authentication pre-share hash sha256 crypto isakmp key xxxxxx address x.1.12.1 ! ! crypto ipsec transform-set TRANS_SET ah-sha256-hmac esp-aes Step 3: Review the crypto map that was bound to the external interface and note the ACL defined that identifies the interesting traffic for the IPsec tunnel. crypto map IPSEC_MGMT_MAP 10 ipsec-isakmp set peer x.1.12.1 set transform-set TRANS_SET match address MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL Step 4: Review the ACL defined in the crypto map and verify that the destination is the management network. ip access-list extended MGMT_TRAFFIC_ACL permit ip 10.1.34.0 0.0.0.255 10.22.2.0 0.0.0.255 Note: The management network is this example is 10.22.2.0/24 If the management traffic is not secured via IPsec tunnel, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to enable the Generalized TTL Security Mechanism (GTSM).

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000470
Rule ID
SV-106081r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000191-RTR-000081
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

As described in RFC 3682, GTSM is designed to protect a router's IP-based control plane from denial of service (DoS) attacks. Many attacks focused on CPU load and line-card overload can be prevented by implementing GTSM on all Exterior Border Gateway Protocol-speaking routers. GTSM is based on the fact that the vast majority of control plane peering is established between adjacent routers; that is, the Exterior Border Gateway Protocol peers are either between connecting interfaces or between loopback interfaces. Since TTL spoofing is considered nearly impossible, a mechanism based on an expected TTL value provides a simple and reasonably robust defense from infrastructure attacks based on forged control plane traffic.

Fix Text

Configure TTL security on all external BGP neighbors as shown in the example below: R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor x.1.1.9 ttl-security hops 1 R1(config-router)#neighbor x.2.1.7 ttl-security hops 1

Check Content

Review the BGP configuration to verify that TTL security has been configured for each external neighbor as shown in the example below: router bgp xx no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.1.1.9 remote-as yy neighbor x.1.1.9 password xxxxxxxx neighbor x.1.1.9 ttl-security hops 1 neighbor x.2.1.7 remote-as zz neighbor x.2.1.7 password xxxxxxxx neighbor x.2.1.7 ttl-security hops 1 If the router is not configured to use GTSM for all Exterior Border Gateway Protocol peering sessions, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to use a unique key for each autonomous system (AS) that it peers with.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000480
Rule ID
SV-106083r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000025-RTR-000021
CCI
CCI-002205
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

If the same keys are used between eBGP neighbors, the chance of a hacker compromising any of the BGP sessions increases. It is possible that a malicious user exists in one autonomous system who would know the key used for the eBGP session. This user would then be able to hijack BGP sessions with other trusted neighbors.

Fix Text

Configure the router to use unique keys for each AS that it peers with as shown in the example below: R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor x.1.1.9 password yyyyyyyy R1(config-router)#neighbor x.2.1.7 password zzzzzzzzz

Check Content

Review the BGP configuration to determine if it is peering with multiple autonomous systems. Interview the ISSM and router administrator to determine if unique keys are being used. router bgp xx no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.1.1.9 remote-as yy neighbor x.1.1.9 password yyyyyyyy neighbor x.2.1.7 remote-as zz neighbor x.2.1.7 password zzzzzzzzz If unique keys are not being used, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to reject inbound route advertisements for any Bogon prefixes.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000490
Rule ID
SV-106085r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000018-RTR-000002
CCI
CCI-001368
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Accepting route advertisements for Bogon prefixes can result in the local autonomous system (AS) becoming a transit for malicious traffic as it will in turn advertise these prefixes to neighbor autonomous systems.

Fix Text

Configure the router to reject inbound route advertisements for any Bogon prefixes. Step 1: Configure a prefix list containing the current Bogon prefixes as shown below: R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 0.0.0.0/8 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 10.0.0.0/8 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 100.64.0.0/10 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 127.0.0.0/8 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 169.254.0.0/16 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 172.16.0.0/12 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 192.0.2.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 192.88.99.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 192.168.0.0/16 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 198.18.0.0/15 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 198.51.100.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 203.0.113.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 224.0.0.0/4 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 240.0.0.0/4 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER deny 240.0.0.0/4 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER permit 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 Step 2: Apply the prefix list filter inbound to each external BGP neighbor as shown in the example: R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor x.1.1.9 prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER in R1(config-router)#neighbor x.2.1.7 prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER in Route Map Alternative: Step 1: Configure the route map referencing the configured prefix list above. R1(config)#route-map FILTER_PREFIX_MAP 10 R1(config-route-map)#match ip address prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER R1(config-route-map)#exit Step 2: Apply the route-map inbound to each external BGP neighbor as shown in the example: R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor x.1.1.9 route-map FILTER_PREFIX_MAP in R1(config-router)#neighbor x.2.1.7 route-map FILTER_PREFIX_MAP in R1(config-router)#end

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that it will reject BGP routes for any Bogon prefixes. Step 1: Verify a prefix list has been configured containing the current Bogon prefixes as shown in the example below: ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 5 deny 0.0.0.0/8 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 10 deny 10.0.0.0/8 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 15 deny 100.64.0.0/10 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 20 deny 127.0.0.0/8 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 25 deny 169.254.0.0/16 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 30 deny 172.16.0.0/12 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 35 deny 192.0.2.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 40 deny 192.88.99.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 45 deny 192.168.0.0/16 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 50 deny 198.18.0.0/15 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 55 deny 198.51.100.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 60 deny 203.0.113.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 65 deny 224.0.0.0/4 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 70 deny 240.0.0.0/4 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 75 permit 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 Step 2: Verify that the prefix list has been applied to all external BGP peers as shown in the example below: router bgp xx no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.1.1.9 remote-as yy neighbor x.1.1.9 prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER in neighbor x.2.1.7 remote-as zz neighbor x.2.1.7 prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER in Route Map Alternative: Verify that the route map applied to the external neighbors references the configured Bogon prefix list shown above. router bgp xx no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.1.1.9 remote-as yy neighbor x.1.1.9 route-map FILTER_PREFIX_MAP neighbor x.2.1.7 remote-as zz neighbor x.2.1.7 route-map FILTER_PREFIX_MAP … route-map FILTER_PREFIX_MAP permit 10 match ip address prefix-list BOGON_PREFIXES If the router is not configured to reject inbound route advertisements for any Bogon prefixes, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to reject inbound route advertisements for any prefixes belonging to the local autonomous system (AS).

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000500
Rule ID
SV-106087r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000018-RTR-000003
CCI
CCI-001368
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Accepting route advertisements belonging to the local AS can result in traffic looping or being black-holed, or at a minimum, using a non-optimized path.

Fix Text

Configure the router to reject inbound route advertisements for any prefixes belonging to the local AS. Step 1: Add to the prefix filter list those prefixes belonging to the local autonomous system. R1(config)#ip prefix-list BOGON_PREFIXES seq 74 deny x.13.1.0/24 le 32 Step 2: If not already completed to be compliant with previous requirement, apply the prefix list filter inbound to each external BGP neighbor as shown in the example. R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor x.1.1.9 prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER in R1(config-router)#neighbor x.2.1.7 prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER in

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that it will reject routes belonging to the local AS. Step 1: Verify a prefix list has been configured containing prefixes belonging to the local AS. In the example below, x.13.1.0/24 is the global address space allocated to the local AS. ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 5 deny 0.0.0.0/8 le 32 … … … ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 74 deny x.13.1.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER seq 75 permit 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 Step 2: Verify that the prefix list has been applied to all external BGP peers as shown in the example below: router bgp xx no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.1.1.9 remote-as yy neighbor x.1.1.9 prefix-list FILTER_PREFIXES in neighbor x.2.1.7 remote-as zz neighbor x.2.1.7 prefix-list FILTER_PREFIXES in If the router is not configured to reject inbound route advertisements belonging to the local AS, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to reject inbound route advertisements from a customer edge (CE) router for prefixes that are not allocated to that customer.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000510
Rule ID
SV-106089r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000018-RTR-000004
CCI
CCI-001368
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

As a best practice, a service provider should only accept customer prefixes that have been assigned to that customer and any peering autonomous systems. A multi-homed customer with BGP speaking routers connected to the Internet or other external networks could be breached and used to launch a prefix de-aggregation attack. Without ingress route filtering of customers, the effectiveness of such an attack could impact the entire IP core and its customers.

Fix Text

Configure the router to reject inbound route advertisements from each CE router for prefixes that are not allocated to that customer. Step 1: Configure a prefix list for each customer containing prefixes belonging to each. R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER_CUST1 permit x.13.1.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER_CUST1 deny 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER_CUST2 permit x.13.2.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER_CUST2 deny 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 Step 2: Apply the prefix list filter inbound to each CE neighbor as shown in the example. R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor x.12.4.14 prefix-list FILTER_PREFIXES_CUST1 in R1(config-router)#neighbor x.12.4.16 prefix-list FILTER_PREFIXES_CUST2 in

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that there are ACLs defined to only accept routes for prefixes that belong to specific customers. Step 1: Verify prefix list has been configured for each customer containing prefixes belonging to each customer as shown in the example below: ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER_CUST1 seq 5 permit x.13.1.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER_CUST1 seq 10 deny 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER_CUST2 seq 5 permit x.13.2.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list PREFIX_FILTER_CUST2 seq 10 deny 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 Step 2: Verify that the prefix lists has been applied to all to the applicable CE peers as shown in the example below: router bgp xx no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.12.4.14 remote-as 64514 neighbor x.12.4.14 prefix-list FILTER_PREFIXES_CUST1 in neighbor x.12.4.16 remote-as 64516 neighbor x.12.4.16 prefix-list FILTER_PREFIXES_CUST2 in Note: Routes to PE-CE links within a VPN are needed for troubleshooting end-to-end connectivity across the MPLS/IP backbone. Hence, these prefixes are an exception to this requirement. If the router is not configured to reject inbound route advertisements from each CE router for prefixes that are not allocated to that customer, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to reject outbound route advertisements for any prefixes that do not belong to any customers or the local autonomous system (AS).

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000520
Rule ID
SV-106091r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000018-RTR-000005
CCI
CCI-001368
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Advertisement of routes by an autonomous system for networks that do not belong to any of its customers pulls traffic away from the authorized network. This causes a denial of service (DoS) on the network that allocated the block of addresses and may cause a DoS on the network that is inadvertently advertising it as the originator. It is also possible that a misconfigured or compromised router within the GIG IP core could redistribute Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) routes into BGP, thereby leaking internal routes.

Fix Text

Step 1: Configure a prefix list for containing all customer and local AS prefixes as shown in the example below: R1(config)#ip prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS permit x.13.1.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS permit x.13.2.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS permit x.13.3.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS permit x.13.4.0/24 le 32 … … … R1(config)#ip prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS deny 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 Step 2: Apply the prefix list filter outbound to each CE neighbor as shown in the example. R1(config)#router bgp 64512 R1(config-router)#neighbor x.12.4.14 prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS out R1(config-router)#neighbor x.12.4.16 prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS out

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Step 1: Verify that a prefix list has been configured containing prefixes belonging to customers as well as the local AS as shown in the example below. ip prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS seq 5 permit x.13.1.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS seq 10 permit x.13.2.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS seq 15 permit x.13.3.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS seq 20 permit x.13.4.0/24 le 32 … … … ip prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS seq 80 deny 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 Step 2: Verify that the prefix lists has been applied to all CE peers as shown in the example below. router bgp 64512 no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.12.4.14 remote-as 64514 neighbor x.12.4.14 prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS out neighbor x.12.4.16 remote-as 64516 neighbor x.12.4.16 prefix-list CE_PREFIX_ADVERTISEMENTS out If the router is not configured to reject outbound route advertisements that do not belong to any customers or the local AS, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to reject outbound route advertisements for any prefixes belonging to the IP core.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000530
Rule ID
SV-106093r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000006
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Outbound route advertisements belonging to the core can result in traffic either looping or being black holed, or at a minimum, using a non-optimized path.

Fix Text

Step 1: Configure a prefix list for containing all customer and local AS prefixes as shown in the example below: R1(config)#ip prefix-list FILTER_CORE_PREFIXES deny x.1.1.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list FILTER _CORE_PREFIXES deny x.1.2.0/24 le 32 R1(config)#ip prefix-list FILTER _CORE_PREFIXES permit 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 Step 2: Apply the prefix list filter outbound to each CE neighbor as shown in the example. R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor x.1.4.12 prefix-list FILTER _CORE_PREFIXES out

Check Content

Step 1: Verify that a prefix list has been configured containing prefixes belonging to the IP core. ip prefix-list FILTER_CORE_PREFIXES seq 5 deny x.1.1.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list FILTER _CORE_PREFIXES seq 10 deny x.1.2.0/24 le 32 ip prefix-list FILTER _CORE_PREFIXES seq 15 permit 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 Step 2: Verify that the prefix lists has been applied to all external BGP peers as shown in the example below: router bgp xx no synchronization bgp log-neighbor-changes neighbor x.1.4.12 remote-as yy neighbor x.1.4.12 prefix-list FILTER _CORE_PREFIXES out If the router is not configured to reject outbound route advertisements for prefixes belonging to the IP core, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to reject route advertisements from BGP peers that do not list their autonomous system (AS) number as the first AS in the AS_PATH attribute.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000540
Rule ID
SV-106095r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000018-RTR-000006
CCI
CCI-000032
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Verifying the path a route has traversed will ensure the IP core is not used as a transit network for unauthorized or possibly even internet traffic. All autonomous system boundary routers (ASBRs) must ensure updates received from eBGP peers list their AS number as the first AS in the AS_PATH attribute.

Fix Text

Configure the router to deny updates received from eBGP peers that do not list their AS number as the first AS in the AS_PATH attribute. R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#bgp enforce-first-as

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify the router is configured to deny updates received from eBGP peers that do not list their AS number as the first AS in the AS_PATH attribute. By default, Cisco IOS enforces the first AS in the AS_PATH attribute for all route advertisements. Review the router configuration to verify that the command no bgp enforce-first-as is not configured. router bgp xx no synchronization no bgp enforce-first-as If the router is not configured to reject updates from peers that do not list their AS number as the first AS in the AS_PATH attribute, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to reject route advertisements from CE routers with an originating AS in the AS_PATH attribute that does not belong to that customer.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000550
Rule ID
SV-106097r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000018-RTR-000010
CCI
CCI-000032
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Verifying the path a route has traversed will ensure that the local AS is not used as a transit network for unauthorized traffic. To ensure that the local AS does not carry any prefixes that do not belong to any customers, all PE routers must be configured to reject routes with an originating AS other than that belonging to the customer.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the router to reject updates from CE routers with an originating AS in the AS_PATH attribute that do not belong to that customer. Step 1: Configure the as-path ACL as shown in the example below: R1(config)#ip as-path access-list 10 permit ^yy$ R1(config)#ip as-path access-list 10 deny .* Step 2: Apply the as-path filter inbound as shown in the example below: R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor x.1.4.12 filter-list 10 in

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to verify the router is configured to deny updates received from CE routers with an originating AS in the AS_PATH attribute that does not belong to that customer. Step 1: Review router configuration and verify that there is an as-path access-list statement defined to only accept routes from a CE router whose AS did not originate the route. The configuration should look similar to the following: ip as-path access-list 10 permit ^yy$ ip as-path access-list 10 deny .* Note: the characters “^” and “$” representing the beginning and the end of the expression respectively are optional and are implicitly defined if omitted. Step 2: Verify that the as-path access-list is referenced by the filter-list inbound for the appropriate BGP neighbors as shown in the example below: router bgp xx neighbor x.1.4.12 remote-as yy neighbor x.1.4.12 filter-list 10 in If the router is not configured to reject updates from CE routers with an originating AS in the AS_PATH attribute that does not belong to that customer, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to use the maximum prefixes feature to protect against route table flooding and prefix de-aggregation attacks.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000560
Rule ID
SV-106099r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000117
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The effects of prefix de-aggregation can degrade router performance due to the size of routing tables and also result in black-holing legitimate traffic. Initiated by an attacker or a misconfigured router, prefix de-aggregation occurs when the announcement of a large prefix is fragmented into a collection of smaller prefix announcements. In 1997, misconfigured routers in the Florida Internet Exchange network (AS7007) de-aggregated every prefix in their routing table and started advertising the first /24 block of each of these prefixes as their own. Faced with this additional burden, the internal routers became overloaded and crashed repeatedly. This caused prefixes advertised by these routers to disappear from routing tables and reappear when the routers came back online. As the routers came back after crashing, they were flooded with the routing table information by their neighbors. The flood of information would again overwhelm the routers and cause them to crash. This process of route flapping served to destabilize not only the surrounding network but also the entire Internet. Routers trying to reach those addresses would choose the smaller, more specific /24 blocks first. This caused backbone networks throughout North America and Europe to crash. Maximum prefix limits on peer connections combined with aggressive prefix-size filtering of customers' reachability advertisements will effectively mitigate the de-aggregation risk. BGP maximum prefix must be used on all eBGP routers to limit the number of prefixes that it should receive from a particular neighbor, whether customer or peering AS. Consider each neighbor and how many routes they should be advertising and set a threshold slightly higher than the number expected.

Fix Text

Configure the router to use the maximum prefixes feature to protect against route table flooding and prefix de-aggregation attacks as shown in the example below: R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor x.1.1.9 maximum-prefix nnnnnnn R1(config-router)#neighbor x.2.1.7 maximum-prefix nnnnnnn

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that the number of received prefixes from each eBGP neighbor is controlled. router bgp xx neighbor x.1.1.9 remote-as yy neighbor x.1.1.9 maximum-prefix nnnnnnn neighbor x.2.1.7 remote-as zz neighbor x.2.1.7 maximum-prefix nnnnnnn If the router is not configured to control the number of prefixes received from each peer to protect against route table flooding and prefix de-aggregation attacks, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to limit the prefix size on any inbound route advertisement to /24, or the least significant prefixes issued to the customer.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000570
Rule ID
SV-106101r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000118
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The effects of prefix de-aggregation can degrade router performance due to the size of routing tables and also result in black-holing legitimate traffic. Initiated by an attacker or a misconfigured router, prefix de-aggregation occurs when the announcement of a large prefix is fragmented into a collection of smaller prefix announcements.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure the router to limit the prefix size on any route advertisement to /24 or the least significant prefixes issued to the customer. Step 1: Configure a prefix list to reject any prefix that is longer than /24. R1(config)#ip prefix-list FILTER_LENGTH permit 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 le 24 R1(config)#ip prefix-list FILTER_LENGTH deny 0.0.0.0/0 le 32 Step 2: Apply the prefix list to all eBGP peers as shown in the example below. R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor x.1.1.9 prefix-list FILTER_PREFIX_LENGTH in R1(config-router)#neighbor x.2.1.7 prefix-list FILTER_PREFIX_LENGTH in

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Review the router configuration to determine if it is compliant with this requirement. Step 1: Verify that a route filter has been configured to reject prefixes longer than /24, or the least significant prefixes issued to the customers as shown in the example below: ip prefix-list FILTER_PREFIX_LENGTH seq 5 permit 0.0.0.0/0 ge 8 le 24 ip prefix-list FILTER_PREFIX_LENGTH seq 10 deny 0.0.0.0/0 le 32 Step 2: Verify that prefix filtering has been applied to each eBGP peer as shown in the example: router bgp xx neighbor x.1.1.9 remote-as yy neighbor x.1.1.9 FILTER_PREFIX_LENGTH nnnnnnn neighbor x.2.1.7 remote-as zz neighbor x.2.1.7 FILTER_PREFIX_LENGTH nnnnnnn If the router is not configured to limit the prefix size on any inbound route advertisement to /24, or the least significant prefixes issued to the customer, this is a finding.

The Cisco BGP router must be configured to use its loopback address as the source address for iBGP peering sessions.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000580
Rule ID
SV-106103r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000001
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Using a loopback address as the source address offers a multitude of uses for security, access, management, and scalability of the BGP routers. It is easier to construct appropriate ingress filters for router management plane traffic destined to the network management subnet since the source addresses will be from the range used for loopback interfaces instead of a larger range of addresses used for physical interfaces. Log information recorded by authentication and syslog servers will record the router’s loopback address instead of the numerous physical interface addresses. When the loopback address is used as the source for eBGP peering, the BGP session will be harder to hijack since the source address to be used is not known globally, making it more difficult for a hacker to spoof an eBGP neighbor. By using traceroute, a hacker can easily determine the addresses for an eBGP speaker when the IP address of an external interface is used as the source address. The routers within the iBGP domain should also use loopback addresses as the source address when establishing BGP sessions.

Fix Text

Configure the router to use its loopback address as the source address for all iBGP peering. R1(config)#router bgp xx R1(config-router)#neighbor 10.1.1.1 update-source Loopback0

Check Content

Step 1: Review the router configuration to verify that a loopback address has been configured. interface Loopback0 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 Step 2: Verify that the loopback interface is used as the source address for all iBGP sessions. router bgp xx no synchronization no bgp enforce-first-as bgp log-neighbor-changes redistribute static neighbor 10.1.1.1 remote-as xx neighbor 10.1.1.1 password xxxxxxxx neighbor 10.1.1.1 update-source Loopback0 If the router does not use its loopback address as the source address for all iBGP sessions, this is a finding.

The Cisco MPLS router must be configured to use its loopback address as the source address for LDP peering sessions.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000590
Rule ID
SV-106105r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000002
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Using a loopback address as the source address offers a multitude of uses for security, access, management, and scalability of backbone routers. It is easier to construct appropriate ingress filters for router management plane traffic destined to the network management subnet since the source addresses will be from the range used for loopback interfaces instead of from a larger range of addresses used for physical interfaces. Log information recorded by authentication and syslog servers will record the router's loopback address instead of the numerous physical interface addresses.

Fix Text

Configure the router to use their loopback address as the source address for LDP peering sessions. As noted in the check content, the default behavior is to use its loopback address. R4(config)#mpls ldp router-id lo0

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if it is compliant with this requirement. Verify that a loopback address has been configured as shown in the following example: interface Loopback0 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 By default, routers will use its loopback address for LDP peering. If an address has not be configured on the loopback interface, it will use its physical interface connecting to the LDP peer. If the router-id command is specified that overrides this default behavior, verify that it is a loopback interface as shown in the example below: mpls ldp router-id Loopback0 If the router is not configured to use its loopback address for LDP peering, this is a finding.

The Cisco MPLS router must be configured to synchronize Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) and LDP to minimize packet loss when an IGP adjacency is established prior to LDP peers completing label exchange.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000600
Rule ID
SV-106107r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000003
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Packet loss can occur when an IGP adjacency is established and the router begins forwarding packets using the new adjacency before the LDP label exchange completes between the peers on that link. Packet loss can also occur if an LDP session closes and the router continues to forward traffic using the link associated with the LDP peer rather than an alternate pathway with a fully synchronized LDP session. The MPLS LDP-IGP Synchronization feature provides a means to synchronize LDP with OSPF or IS-IS to minimize MPLS packet loss. When an IGP adjacency is established on a link but LDP-IGP synchronization is not yet achieved or is lost, the IGP will advertise the max-metric on that link.

Fix Text

Configure the MPLS router to synchronize IGP and LDP, minimizing packet loss when an IGP adjacency is established prior to LDP peers completing label exchange. OSPF Example: R2(config)#router ospf 1 R2(config-router)#mpls ldp sync IS-IS Example: R5(config)#router isis R5(config-router)#mpls ldp sync

Check Content

Review the router OSPF or IS-IS configuration and verify that LDP will synchronize with the link-state routing protocol as shown in the example below: OSPF Example: router ospf 1 mpls ldp sync IS-IS Example: router isis mpls ldp sync net 49.0001.1234.1600.5531.00 If the router is not configured to synchronize IGP and LDP, this is a finding.

The MPLS router with RSVP-TE enabled must be configured with message pacing to adjust maximum burst and maximum number of RSVP messages to an output queue based on the link speed and input queue size of adjacent core routers.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000610
Rule ID
SV-106109r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000193-RTR-000001
CCI
CCI-001095
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

RSVP-TE can be used to perform constraint-based routing when building LSP tunnels within the network core that will support QoS and traffic engineering requirements. RSVP-TE is also used to enable MPLS Fast Reroute, a network restoration mechanism that will reroute traffic onto a backup LSP in case of a node or link failure along the primary path. When there is a disruption in the MPLS core, such as a link flap or router reboot, the result is a significant amount of RSVP signaling, such as "PathErr" and "ResvErr" messages that need to be sent for every LSP using that link. When RSVP messages are sent out, they are sent either hop by hop or with the router alert bit set in the IP header. This means that every router along the path must examine the packet to determine if additional processing is required for these RSVP messages. If there is enough signaling traffic in the network, it is possible for an interface to receive more packets for its input queue than it can hold, resulting in dropped RSVP messages and hence slower RSVP convergence. Increasing the size of the interface input queue can help prevent dropping packets; however, there is still the risk of having a burst of signaling traffic that can fill the queue. Solutions to mitigate this risk are RSVP message pacing or refresh reduction to control the rate at which RSVP messages are sent. RSVP refresh reduction includes the following features: RSVP message bundling, RSVP Message ID to reduce message processing overhead, reliable delivery of RSVP messages using Message ID, and summary refresh to reduce the amount of information transmitted every refresh interval.

Fix Text

Configure the router to rate limit RSVP messages per interface as shown in the example. R2(config)#ip rsvp signalling rate-limit burst 9 maxsize 2100 period 30 limit 50

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine RSVP messages are rate limited. Step 1: Determine if MPLS TE is enabled globally and at least one interface as shown in the example below: mpls traffic-eng tunnels … … … interface GigabitEthernet0/2 ip address x.x.x.x 255.255.255.0 mpls traffic-eng tunnels mpls ip Step 2: If MPLS TE is enabled, verify that message pacing is enabled. ip rsvp signalling rate-limit period 30 burst 9 maxsize 2100 limit 50 Note: The command "ip rsvp msg-pacing" has been deprecated by the command "ip rsvp signalling rate-limit" If the router with RSVP-TE enabled does not rate limit RSVP messages based on the link speed and input queue size of adjacent core routers, this is a finding.

The Cisco MPLS router must be configured to have TTL Propagation disabled.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000620
Rule ID
SV-106111r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000004
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The head end of the label-switched path (LSP), the label edge router (LER) will decrement the IP packet's time-to-live (TTL) value by one and then copy the value to the MPLS TTL field. At each label-switched router (LSR) hop, the MPLS TTL value is decremented by one. The MPLS router that pops the label (either the penultimate LSR or the egress LER) will copy the packet's MPLS TTL value to the IP TTL field and decrement it by one. This TTL propagation is the default behavior. Because the MPLS TTL is propagated from the IP TTL, a traceroute will list every hop in the path, be it routed or label switched, thereby exposing core nodes. With TTL propagation disabled, LER decrements the IP packet's TTL value by one and then places a value of 255 in the packet's MPLS TTL field, which is then decremented by one as the packet passes through each LSR in the MPLS core. Because the MPLS TTL never drops to zero, none of the LSP hops triggers an ICMP TTL exceeded message, and consequently, these hops are not recorded in a traceroute. Hence, nodes within the MPLS core cannot be discovered by an attacker.

Fix Text

Configure the MPLS router to disable TTL propagation as shown in the example below: R5(config)#no mpls ip propagate-ttl

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that TTL propagation is disabled as shown in the example below: no mpls ip propagate-ttl If the MPLS router is not configured to disable TTL propagation, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router must be configured to have each Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) instance bound to the appropriate physical or logical interfaces to maintain traffic separation between all MPLS L3VPNs.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000630
Rule ID
SV-106113r1_rule
Severity
Cat I
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000005
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The primary security model for an MPLS L3VPN infrastructure is traffic separation. The service provider must guarantee the customer that traffic from one VPN does not leak into another VPN or into the core, and that core traffic must not leak into any VPN. Hence, it is imperative that each CE-facing interface can only be associated to one VRF—that alone is the fundamental framework for traffic separation.

Fix Text

Configure the PE router to have each VRF bound to the appropriate physical or logical interfaces to maintain traffic separation between all MPLS L3VPNs.

Check Content

Step 1: Review the design plan for deploying L3VPN and VRF-lite. Step 2: Review the design plan for deploying L3VPN and VRF-lite. Review all CE-facing interfaces and verify that the proper VRF is defined via the "ip vrf forwarding" command. In the example below, COI1 is bound to interface GigabitEthernet0/1, while COI2 is bound to GigabitEthernet0/2. interface GigabitEthernet0/1 description link to COI1 ip vrf forwarding COI1 ip address x.1.0.1 255.255.255.0 ! interface GigabitEthernet0/2 description link to COI2 ip vrf forwarding COI2 ip address x.2.0.2 255.255.255.0 If any VRFs are not bound to the appropriate physical or logical interface, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router must be configured to have each VRF with the appropriate Route Distinguisher (RD).

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000650
Rule ID
SV-106117r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000007
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

An RD provides uniqueness to the customer address spaces within the MPLS L3VPN infrastructure. The concept of the VPN-IPv4 and VPN-IPv6 address families consists of the RD prepended before the IP address. Hence, if the same IP prefix is used in several different L3VPNs, it is possible for BGP to carry several completely different routes for that prefix, one for each VPN. Since VPN-IPv4 addresses and IPv4 addresses are different address families, BGP never treats them as comparable addresses. The purpose of the RD is to create distinct routes for common IPv4 address prefixes. On any given PE router, a single RD can define a VRF in which the entire address space may be used independently, regardless of the makeup of other VPN address spaces. Hence, it is imperative that a unique RD is assigned to each L3VPN and that the proper RD is configured for each VRF.

Fix Text

Configure the correct RD for each VRF. R5(config)#ip vrf CUST1 R5(config-vrf)#rd 13:13 R5(config-vrf)#end

Check Content

Review the design plan for MPLS/L3VPN to determine what RD have been assigned for each VRF. Review the router configuration and verify that the correct RD is configured for each VRF. In the example below, route distinguisher 13:13 has been configured for customer 1. ip vrf CUST1 rd 13:13 Note: This requirement is only applicable for MPLS L3VPN implementations. If the wrong RD has been configured for any VRF, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router providing MPLS Layer 2 Virtual Private Network (L2VPN) services must be configured to authenticate targeted Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) sessions used to exchange virtual circuit (VC) information using a FIPS-approved message authentication code algorithm.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000660
Rule ID
SV-106119r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000343-RTR-000001
CCI
CCI-001958
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

LDP provides the signaling required for setting up and tearing down pseudowires (virtual circuits used to transport Layer 2 frames) across an MPLS IP core network. Using a targeted LDP session, each PE router advertises a virtual circuit label mapping that is used as part of the label stack imposed on the frames by the ingress PE router during packet forwarding. Authentication provides protection against spoofed TCP segments that can be introduced into the LDP sessions.

Fix Text

The severity level can be downgraded to a category 3 if the router is configured to authenticate targeted LDP sessions using MD5 as shown in the example below. R5(config)#mpls ldp neighbor 10.1.1.2 password xxxxxxxx

Check Content

The Cisco router is not compliant with this requirement; hence, it is a finding. However, the severity level can be downgraded to a category 3 if the router is configured to authenticate targeted LDP sessions using MD5 as shown in the configuration example below. mpls ldp neighbor 10.1.1.2 password xxxxxxx mpls label protocol ldp If the router is not configured to authenticate targeted LDP sessions using MD5, the finding will remain as a CAT II.

The Cisco PE router providing MPLS Virtual Private Wire Service (VPWS) must be configured to have the appropriate virtual circuit identification (VC ID) for each attachment circuit.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000670
Rule ID
SV-106121r1_rule
Severity
Cat I
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000008
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

VPWS is an L2VPN technology that provides a virtual circuit between two PE routers to forward Layer 2 frames between two customer-edge routers or switches through an MPLS-enabled IP core. The ingress PE router (virtual circuit head-end) encapsulates Ethernet frames inside MPLS packets using label stacking and forwards them across the MPLS network to the egress PE router (virtual circuit tail-end). During a virtual circuit setup, the PE routers exchange VC label bindings for the specified VC ID. The VC ID specifies a pseudowire associated with an ingress and egress PE router and the customer-facing attachment circuits. To guarantee that all frames are forwarded onto the correct pseudowire and to the correct customer and attachment circuits, it is imperative that the correct VC ID is configured for each attachment circuit.

Fix Text

Assign globally unique VC IDs for each virtual circuit and configure the attachment circuits with the appropriate VC ID. R5(config)#int g0/1 R5(config-if)#xconnect x.2.2.12 55 encapsulation mpls

Check Content

Verify that the correct and unique VCID has been configured for the appropriate attachment circuit. In the example below, GigabitEthernet0/1 is the CE-facing interface that is configured for VPWS with the VCID of 55. interface GigabitEthernet0/1 xconnect x.2.2.12 55 encapsulation mpls If the correct VC ID has not been configured on both routers, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router providing Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) must be configured to have all attachment circuits defined to the virtual forwarding instance (VFI) with the globally unique VPN ID assigned for each customer VLAN.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000680
Rule ID
SV-106123r1_rule
Severity
Cat I
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000009
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

VPLS defines an architecture that delivers Ethernet multipoint services over an MPLS network. Customer Layer 2 frames are forwarded across the MPLS core via pseudowires using IEEE 802.1q Ethernet bridging principles. A pseudowire is a virtual bidirectional connection between two attachment circuits (virtual connections between PE and CE routers). A pseudowire contains two unidirectional label-switched paths (LSP) between two PE routers. Each MAC virtual forwarding table instance (VFI) is interconnected using pseudowires provisioned for the bridge domain, thereby maintaining privacy and logical separation between each VPLS bridge domain. The VFI specifies the pseudowires associated with connecting PE routers and the customer-facing attachment circuits belonging to a given VLAN. Resembling a Layer 2 switch, the VFI is responsible for learning MAC addresses and providing loop-free forwarding of customer traffic to the appropriate end nodes. Each VPLS domain is identified by a globally unique VPN ID; hence, VFIs of the same VPLS domain must be configured with the same VPN ID on all participating PE routers. To guarantee traffic separation for all customer VLANs and that all packets are forwarded to the correct destination, it is imperative that the correct attachment circuits are associated with the appropriate VFI and that each VFI is associated to the unique VPN ID assigned to the customer VLAN.

Fix Text

Assign globally unique VPN IDs for each customer bridge domain using VPLS for carrier Ethernet services between multiple sites, and configure the attachment circuits to the appropriate VFI. R1(config)#l2 vfi VPLS_A manual R1(config-vfi)#vpn id 110 R1(config-vfi)#neighbor 10.3.3.3 encapsulation mpls R1(config-vfi)#bridge-domain 100 R1(config-vfi)#exit R1(config-if)#service instance 10 ethernet R1(config-if-srv)#encapsulation untagged R1(config-if-srv)#bridge-domain 100 R1(config-if-srv)#end

Check Content

Review the implementation plan and the VPN IDs assigned to customer VLANs for the VPLS deployment. Review the PE router configuration to verify that customer attachment circuits are associated to the appropriate VFI. In the example below, the attached circuit at interface GigabitEthernet3 is associated to VPN ID 110. l2 vfi VPLS_A manual vpn id 110 bridge-domain 100 neighbor 10.3.3.3 encapsulation mpls neighbor 10.3.3.4 encapsulation mpls … … … interface GigabitEthernet3 no ip address service instance 10 ethernet encapsulation untagged bridge-domain 100 If the attachment circuits have not been bound to VFI configured with the assigned VPN ID for each VLAN, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router must be configured to enforce the split-horizon rule for all pseudowires within a Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) bridge domain.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000690
Rule ID
SV-106125r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000010
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

A virtual forwarding instance (VFI) must be created on each participating PE router for each customer VLAN using VPLS for carrier Ethernet services. The VFI specifies the VPN ID of a VPLS domain, the addresses of other PE routers in the domain, and the type of tunnel signaling and encapsulation mechanism for each peer PE router. The set of VFIs formed by the interconnection of the emulated VCs is called a VPLS instance, which forms the logic bridge over the MPLS core network. The PE routers use the VFI with a unique VPN ID to establish a full mesh of emulated virtual circuits or pseudowires to all the other PE routers in the VPLS instance. The full-mesh configuration allows the PE router to maintain a single broadcast domain. With a full-mesh configuration, signaling and packet replication requirements for each provisioned virtual circuit on a PE can be high. To avoid the problem of a packet looping in the provider core, thereby adding more overhead, the PE devices must enforce a split-horizon principle for the emulated virtual circuits; that is, if a packet is received on an emulated virtual circuit, it is not forwarded on any other virtual circuit.

Fix Text

Enable split horizon on all PE routers deploying VPLS in a full-mesh configuration. R1(config)#l2 vfi VPLS_A manual R1(config-vfi)#neighbor 10.3.3.3 encapsulation mpls

Check Content

Review the PE router configuration to verify that split horizon is enabled. By default, split horizon is enabled; hence, the attribute no-split-horizon should not be seen on the neighbor command as shown in the example below: l2 vfi VPLS_A manual vpn id 110 bridge-domain 100 neighbor 10.3.3.3 encapsulation mpls no-split-horizon If split horizon is not enabled, this is a finding. Note: This requirement is only applicable to a mesh VPLS topology. VPLS solves the loop problem by using a split-horizon rule which states that member PE routers of a VPLS must forward VPLS traffic only to the local attachment circuits when they receive the traffic from the other PE routers. In a ring VPLS, split horizon must be disabled so that a PE router can forward a packet received from one pseudowire to another pseudowire. To prevent the consequential loop, at least one span in the ring would not have a pseudowire for any given VPLS instance.

The Cisco PE router providing Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) must be configured to have traffic storm control thresholds on CE-facing interfaces.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000700
Rule ID
SV-106127r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000193-RTR-000002
CCI
CCI-001095
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

A traffic storm occurs when packets flood a VPLS bridge, creating excessive traffic and degrading network performance. Traffic storm control prevents VPLS bridge disruption by suppressing traffic when the number of packets reaches configured threshold levels. Traffic storm control monitors incoming traffic levels on a port and drops traffic when the number of packets reaches the configured threshold level during any one-second interval.

Fix Text

Configure storm control for each CE-facing interface as shown in the example below: R1(config)#int g3 R1(config-if)#service instance 10 ethernet R1(config-if-srv)#storm-control broadcast cir 12000000 R1(config-if-srv)#end Note: The acceptable range is 10000000 -1000000000 for a gigabit ethernet interface, and 100000000-10000000000 for a ten gigabit interface. Storm control is not supported on most FastEthernet interfaces.

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that storm control is enabled on CE-facing interfaces deploying VPLS as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet3 no ip address service instance 10 ethernet encapsulation untagged bridge-domain 100 storm-control broadcast cir 12000000 ! ! If storm control is not enabled at a minimum for broadcast traffic, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router must be configured to implement Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) or Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) snooping for each Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) bridge domain.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000710
Rule ID
SV-106129r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000119
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

IGMP snooping provides a way to constrain multicast traffic at Layer 2. By monitoring the IGMP membership reports sent by hosts within the bridge domain, the snooping application can set up Layer 2 multicast forwarding tables to deliver traffic only to ports with at least one interested member within the VPLS bridge, thereby significantly reducing the volume of multicast traffic that would otherwise flood an entire VPLS bridge domain. The IGMP snooping operation applies to both access circuits and pseudowires within a VPLS bridge domain.

Fix Text

Configure IGMP or MLD snooping for IPv4 and IPv6 multicast traffic respectively for each VPLS bridge domain. R1(config)#bridge-domain 100 R1(config-bdomain)#ip igmp snooping R1(config-bdomain)#end

Check Content

Review the router configuration to verify that IGMP or MLD snooping has been configured for IPv4 and IPv6 multicast traffic respectively for each VPLS bridge domain. The example below are the steps to verify that IGMP snooping is enabled for a VPLS bridge domain. Step 1: Verify that IGMP snooping is enabled globally. By default, IGMP snooping is enabled globally; hence, the following command should not be in the router configuration: no ip igmp snooping Step 2: If IGMP snooping is enabled globally, it will also be enabled by default for each VPLS bridge domain. Hence, the command no ip igmp snooping should not be configured for any VPLS bridge domain as shown in the example below: bridge-domain 100 no ip igmp snooping ! If the router is not configured to implement IGMP or MLD snooping for each VPLS bridge domain, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router must be configured to limit the number of MAC addresses it can learn for each Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) bridge domain.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000720
Rule ID
SV-106131r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000192-RTR-000002
CCI
CCI-001094
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

VPLS defines an architecture that delivers Ethernet multipoint services over an MPLS network. Customer Layer 2 frames are forwarded across the MPLS core via pseudowires using IEEE 802.1q Ethernet bridging principles. A pseudowire is a virtual bidirectional connection between two attachment circuits (virtual connections between PE and CE routers). A pseudowire contains two unidirectional label-switched paths (LSP). Each MAC forwarding table instance is interconnected using domain-specific LSPs, thereby maintaining privacy and logical separation between each VPLS domain. When a frame arrives on a bridge port (pseudowire or attachment circuit) and the source MAC address is unknown to the receiving PE router, the source MAC address is associated with the pseudowire or attachment circuit and the forwarding table is updated accordingly. Frames are forwarded to the appropriate pseudowire or attachment circuit according to the forwarding table entry for the destination MAC address. Ethernet frames sent to broadcast and unknown destination addresses must be flooded out to all interfaces for the bridge domain; hence, a PE router must replicate packets across both attachment circuits and pseudowires. A malicious attacker residing in a customer network could launch a source MAC address spoofing attack by flooding packets to a valid unicast destination, each with a different MAC source address. The PE router receiving this traffic would try to learn every new MAC address and would quickly run out of space for the VFI forwarding table. Older, valid MAC addresses would be removed from the table, and traffic sent to them would have to be flooded until the storm threshold limit is reached. Hence, it is essential that a limit is established to control the number of MAC addresses that will be learned and recorded into the forwarding table for each bridge domain.

Fix Text

Configure a MAC address learning limit for each VPLS bridge domain. R1(config-bdomain)#mac limit maximum addresses nnnn

Check Content

Review the PE router configuration to determine if a MAC address limit has been set for each VPLS bridge domain. bridge-domain 100 mac limit maximum addresses nnnnn If a limit has not been configured, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router must be configured to block any traffic that is destined to IP core infrastructure.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000730
Rule ID
SV-106133r1_rule
Severity
Cat I
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000007
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

IP/MPLS networks providing VPN and transit services must provide, at the least, the same level of protection against denial of service (DoS) attacks and intrusions as Layer 2 networks. Although the IP core network elements are hidden, security should never rely entirely on obscurity. IP addresses can be guessed. Core network elements must not be accessible from any external host. Protecting the core from any attack is vital for the integrity and privacy of customer traffic as well as the availability of transit services. A compromise of the IP core can result in an outage or, at a minimum, non-optimized forwarding of customer traffic. Protecting the core from an outside attack also prevents attackers from using the core to attack any customer. Hence, it is imperative that all routers at the edge deny traffic destined to any address belonging to the IP core infrastructure.

Fix Text

Configure protection for the IP core to be implemented at the edges by blocking any traffic with a destination address assigned to the IP core infrastructure. Step 1: Configure an ingress ACL to discard and log packets destined to the IP core address space. R2(config)#ip access-list extended BLOCK_TO_CORE R2(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any 10.1.x.0 0.0.255.255 log-input R2(config-ext-nacl)#exit Step 2: Apply the ACL inbound to all external or CE-facing interfaces. R2(config)#int R4(config)#int g0/2 R2(config-if)#ip access-group BLOCK_TO_CORE in R2(config-if)#end

Check Content

Step 1: Review the router configuration to verify that an ingress ACL is applied to all external or CE-facing interfaces. interface GigabitEthernet0/2 ip address x.1.12.2 255.255.255.252 ip access-group BLOCK_TO_CORE in Step 2: Verify that the ingress ACL discards and logs packets destined to the IP core address space. ip access-list extended BLOCK_TO_CORE deny ip any 10.1.x.0 0.0.255.255 log-input permit ip any any ! If the PE router is not configured to block any traffic with a destination address assigned to the IP core infrastructure, this is a finding. Note: Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo requests and traceroutes will be allowed to the edge from external adjacent neighbors.

The Cisco PE router must be configured with Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (uRPF) loose mode enabled on all CE-facing interfaces.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000740
Rule ID
SV-106135r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000205-RTR-000008
CCI
CCI-001097
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The uRPF feature is a defense against spoofing and denial of service (DoS) attacks by verifying if the source address of any ingress packet is reachable. To mitigate attacks that rely on forged source addresses, all provider edge routers must enable uRPF loose mode to guarantee that all packets received from a CE router contain source addresses that are in the route table.

Fix Text

Configure uRPF loose mode on all CE-facing interfaces as shown in the example below. R2(config)#int R4(config)#int g0/2 R2(config-if)#ip verify unicast source reachable-via any R2(config-if)#end

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if uRPF loose mode is enabled on all CE-facing interfaces. interface GigabitEthernet0/2 ip address x.1.12.2 255.255.255.252 ip access-group BLOCK_TO_CORE in ip verify unicast source reachable-via any If uRPF loose mode is not enabled on all CE-facing interfaces, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router must be configured to ignore or drop all packets with any IP options.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000750
Rule ID
SV-106137r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000195-RTR-000085
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Packets with IP options are not fast-switched and therefore must be punted to the router processor. Hackers who initiate denial of service (DoS) attacks on routers commonly send large streams of packets with IP options. Dropping the packets with IP options reduces the load of IP options packets on the router. The end result is a reduction in the effects of the DoS attack on the router and on downstream routers.

Fix Text

Configure the router to ignore or drop all packets with IP options as shown in the examples below: R4(config)#ip options ignore or R4(config)#ip options drop

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if it will ignore or drop all packets with IP options as shown in the examples below: ip options drop or ip options ignore If the router is not configured to drop or block all packets with IP options, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router must be configured to enforce a Quality-of-Service (QoS) policy in accordance with the QoS DODIN Technical Profile.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000760
Rule ID
SV-106139r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000193-RTR-000113
CCI
CCI-001095
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Different applications have unique requirements and toleration levels for delay, jitter, bandwidth, packet loss, and availability. To manage the multitude of applications and services, a network requires a QoS framework to differentiate traffic and provide a method to manage network congestion. The Differentiated Services Model (DiffServ) is based on per-hop behavior by categorizing traffic into different classes and enabling each node to enforce a forwarding treatment to each packet as dictated by a policy. Packet markings such as IP Precedence and its successor, Differentiated Services Code Points (DSCP), were defined along with specific per-hop behaviors for key traffic types to enable a scalable QoS solution. DiffServ QoS categorizes network traffic, prioritizes it according to its relative importance, and provides priority treatment based on the classification. It is imperative that end-to-end QoS is implemented within the IP core network to provide preferred treatment for mission-critical applications.

Fix Text

Configure a QoS policy in accordance with the QoS DODIN. Step 1: Configure class-maps to match on DSCP values as shown in the configuration example below: R5(config-cmap)#class-map match-all C2_VOICE R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp 47 R5(config-cmap)#class-map match-all VOICE R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp ef R5(config-cmap)#class-map match-all VIDEO R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp af41 R5(config-cmap)#class-map match-all CONTROL_PLANE R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp cs6 R5(config)#class-map match-all PREFERRED_DATA R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp af33 R5(config-cmap)#exit Step 2: Configure a policy map to be applied to the core-layer-facing interface that reserves the bandwidth for each traffic type as shown in the example below: R5(config)#policy-map QOS_POLICY R5(config-pmap-c)#class C2_VOICE R5(config-pmap-c)#priority percent 10 R5(config-pmap-c)#class VOICE R5(config-pmap-c)#priority percent 15 R5(config-pmap-c)#class VIDEO R5(config-pmap-c)#bandwidth percent 25 R5(config-pmap)#class CONTROL_PLANE R5(config-pmap-c)#priority percent 10 R5(config-pmap-c)#class PREFERRED_DATA R5(config-pmap-c)#bandwidth percent 25 R5(config-pmap-c)#class class-default R5(config-pmap-c)#bandwidth percent 15 R5(config-pmap-c)#exit R5(config-pmap)#exit Step 3: Apply the output service policy to the core-layer-facing interface as shown in the configuration example below: R5(config)#int g1/1 R5(config-if)#service-policy output QOS_POLICY R5(config-if)#exit R5(config)#int g1/2 R5(config-if)#service-policy output QOS_POLICY R5(config-if)#end

Check Content

Review the router configuration and verify that a QoS policy has been configured to provide preferred treatment for mission-critical applications in accordance with the QoS DODIN. Step 1: Verify that the class-maps are configured to match on DSCP values as shown in the configuration example below: class-map match-all C2_VOICE match ip dscp af47 class-map match-all VOICE match ip dscp ef class-map match-all VIDEO match ip dscp af41 class-map match-all CONTROL_PLANE match ip dscp cs6 class-map match-all PREFERRED_DATA match ip dscp af33 Step 2: Verify that the policy map reserves the bandwidth for each traffic type as shown in the following example: policy-map QOS_POLICY class C2_VOICE priority percent 10 class VOICE priority percent 15 class VIDEO bandwidth percent 25 class CONTROL_PLANE priority percent 10 class PREFERRED_DATA bandwidth percent 25 class class-default bandwidth percent 15 Step 3: Verify that an output service policy is bound to all interfaces as shown in the configuration example below: interface GigabitEthernet1/1 ip address 10.1.15.1 255.255.255.252 service-policy output QOS_POLICY ! interface GigabitEthernet1/2 ip address 10.1.15.4 255.255.255.252 service-policy output QOS_POLICY Note: Enclaves must mark or re-mark their traffic to be consistent with the DODIN backbone admission criteria to gain the appropriate level of service. A general DiffServ principle is to mark or trust traffic as close to the source as administratively and technically possible. However, certain traffic types might need to be re-marked before handoff to the DODIN backbone to gain admission to the correct class. If such re-marking is required, it is recommended that the re-marking be performed at the CE egress edge. If the router is not configured to enforce a QoS policy in accordance with the QoS DODIN Technical Profile, this is a finding.

The Cisco P router must be configured to implement a Quality-of-Service (QoS) policy in accordance with the QoS DODIN Technical Profile.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000770
Rule ID
SV-106141r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000193-RTR-000114
CCI
CCI-001095
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Different applications have unique requirements and toleration levels for delay, jitter, bandwidth, packet loss, and availability. To manage the multitude of applications and services, a network requires a QoS framework to differentiate traffic and provide a method to manage network congestion. The Differentiated Services Model (DiffServ) is based on per-hop behavior by categorizing traffic into different classes and enabling each node to enforce a forwarding treatment to each packet as dictated by a policy. Packet markings such as IP Precedence and its successor, Differentiated Services Code Points (DSCP), were defined along with specific per-hop behaviors for key traffic types to enable a scalable QoS solution. DiffServ QoS categorizes network traffic, prioritizes it according to its relative importance, and provides priority treatment based on the classification. It is imperative that end-to-end QoS is implemented within the IP core network to provide preferred treatment for mission-critical applications.

Fix Text

Configure a QoS policy in accordance with the QoS DODIN Technical Profile. Step 1: Configure class-maps to match on DSCP values as shown in the configuration example below: R5(config)#class-map match-all PREFERRED_DATA R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp af33 R5(config-cmap)#class-map match-all CONTROL_PLANE R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp cs6 R5(config-cmap)#class-map match-all VIDEO R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp af41 R5(config-cmap)#class-map match-all VOICE R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp ef R5(config-cmap)#class-map match-all C2_VOICE R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp 47 R5(config-cmap)#exit Step 2: Configure a policy map to be applied to the core-layer-facing interface that reserves the bandwidth for each traffic type as shown in the example below: R5(config)#policy-map QOS_POLICY R5(config-pmap)#class CONTROL_PLANE R5(config-pmap-c)#priority percent 10 R5(config-pmap-c)#class C2_VOICE R5(config-pmap-c)#priority percent 10 R5(config-pmap-c)#class VOICE R5(config-pmap-c)#priority percent 15 R5(config-pmap-c)#class VIDEO R5(config-pmap-c)#bandwidth percent 25 R5(config-pmap-c)#class PREFERRED_DATA R5(config-pmap-c)#bandwidth percent 25 R5(config-pmap-c)#class class-default R5(config-pmap-c)#bandwidth percent 15 R5(config-pmap-c)#exit R5(config-pmap)#exit Step 3: Apply the output service policy to all interfaces as shown in the configuration example below: R5(config)#int g1/1 R5(config-if)#service-policy output QOS_POLICY R5(config-if)#exit R5(config)#int g1/2 R5(config-if)#service-policy output QOS_POLICY R5(config-if)#end

Check Content

Review the router configuration and verify that a QoS policy has been configured to provide preferred treatment for mission-critical applications in accordance with the QoS DODIN Technical Profile. Step 1: Verify that the class-maps are configured to match on DSCP values as shown in the configuration example below: class-map match-all PREFERRED_DATA match ip dscp af33 class-map match-all CONTROL_PLANE match ip dscp cs6 class-map match-all VIDEO match ip dscp af41 class-map match-all VOICE match ip dscp ef class-map match-all C2_VOICE match ip dscp 47 Step 2: Verify that the policy map reserves the bandwidth for each traffic type as shown in the following example: policy-map QOS_POLICY class CONTROL_PLANE priority percent 10 class C2_VOICE priority percent 10 class VOICE priority percent 15 class VIDEO bandwidth percent 25 class PREFERRED_DATA bandwidth percent 25 class class-default bandwidth percent 15 Step 3: Verify that an output service policy is bound to all interfaces as shown in the configuration example below: interface GigabitEthernet1/1 ip address 10.1.15.5 255.255.255.252 service-policy output QOS_POLICY ! interface GigabitEthernet1/2 ip address 10.1.15.8 255.255.255.252 service-policy output QOS_POLICY If the router is not configured to implement a QoS policy in accordance with the QoS DODIN Technical Profile, this is a finding.

The Cisco router must be configured to enforce a Quality-of-Service (QoS) policy to limit the effects of packet flooding denial of service (DoS) attacks.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000780
Rule ID
SV-106143r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000193-RTR-000112
CCI
CCI-001095
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

DoS is a condition when a resource is not available for legitimate users. Packet flooding distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks are referred to as volumetric attacks and have the objective of overloading a network or circuit to deny or seriously degrade performance, which denies access to the services that normally traverse the network or circuit. Volumetric attacks have become relatively easy to launch using readily available tools such as Low Orbit Ion Cannon or botnets. Measures to mitigate the effects of a successful volumetric attack must be taken to ensure that sufficient capacity is available for mission-critical traffic. Managing capacity may include, for example, establishing selected network usage priorities or quotas and enforcing them using rate limiting, Quality of Service (QoS), or other resource reservation control methods. These measures may also mitigate the effects of sudden decreases in network capacity that are the result of accidental or intentional physical damage to telecommunications facilities (such as cable cuts or weather-related outages).

Fix Text

Step 1: Configure a class map for the SCAVENGER class. R5(config)#class-map match-all SCAVENGER R5(config-cmap)#match ip dscp cs1 Step 2: Add the SCAVENGER class to the policy map as shown in the example below: R5(config)#policy-map QOS_POLICY R5(config-pmap-c)#no class class-default R5(config-pmap)#class SCAVENGER R5(config-pmap-c)#bandwidth percent 5 R5(config-pmap-c)#class class-default R5(config-pmap-c)#bandwidth percent 10 R5(config-pmap-c)#end

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if it is configured to enforce a QoS policy to limit the effects of packet flooding DoS attacks. Step 1: Verify that a class map has been configured for the Scavenger class as shown in the example below. class-map match-all SCAVENGER match ip dscp cs1 Step 2: Verify that the policy map includes the SCAVENGER class with low priority as shown in the following example below. policy-map QOS_POLICY class CONTROL_PLANE priority percent 10 class C2_VOICE priority percent 10 class VOICE priority percent 15 class VIDEO bandwidth percent 25 class PREFERRED_DATA bandwidth percent 25 class SCAVENGER bandwidth percent 5 class class-default bandwidth percent 10 Note: Traffic out of profile must be marked at the customer access layer or CE egress edge. If the router is not configured to enforce a QoS policy to limit the effects of packet flooding DoS attacks, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast router must be configured to disable Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) on all interfaces that are not required to support multicast routing.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000790
Rule ID
SV-106145r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000003
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

If multicast traffic is forwarded beyond the intended boundary, it is possible that it can be intercepted by unauthorized or unintended personnel. Limiting where, within the network, a given multicast group's data is permitted to flow is an important first step in improving multicast security. A scope zone is an instance of a connected region of a given scope. Zones of the same scope cannot overlap while zones of a smaller scope will fit completely within a zone of a larger scope. For example, Admin-local scope is smaller than Site-local scope, so the administratively configured boundary fits within the bounds of a site. According to RFC 4007 IPv6 Scoped Address Architecture (section 5), scope zones are also required to be "convex from a routing perspective"; that is, packets routed within a zone must not pass through any links that are outside of the zone. This requirement forces each zone to be one contiguous island rather than a series of separate islands. As stated in the DoD IPv6 IA Guidance for MO3, "One should be able to identify all interfaces of a zone by drawing a closed loop on their network diagram, engulfing some routers and passing through some routers to include only some of their interfaces." Therefore, it is imperative that the network engineers have documented their multicast topology and thereby knows which interfaces are enabled for multicast. Once this is done, the zones can be scoped as required.

Fix Text

Document all enabled interfaces for PIM in the network's multicast topology diagram. Disable support for PIM on interfaces that are not required to support it. R5(config)#int g1/1 R5(config-if)#no ip pim sparse-mode

Check Content

Step 1: Review the network's multicast topology diagram. Step 2: Review the router configuration to verify that only the PIM interfaces as shown in the multicast topology diagram are enabled for PIM as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet1/1 ip address 10.1.3.3 255.255.255.0 ip pim sparse-mode If an interface is not required to support multicast routing and it is enabled, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast router must be configured to bind a Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) neighbor filter to interfaces that have PIM enabled.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000800
Rule ID
SV-106147r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000004
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

PIM is a routing protocol used to build multicast distribution trees for forwarding multicast traffic across the network infrastructure. PIM traffic must be limited to only known PIM neighbors by configuring and binding a PIM neighbor filter to those interfaces that have PIM enabled. If a PIM neighbor filter is not applied to those interfaces that have PIM enabled, unauthorized routers can join the PIM domain, discover and use the rendezvous points, and also advertise their rendezvous points into the domain. This can result in a denial of service by traffic flooding or result in the unauthorized transfer of data.

Fix Text

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Configure neighbor ACLs to only accept PIM control plane traffic from documented PIM neighbors. Bind neighbor ACLs to all PIM enabled interfaces. Step 1: Configure ACL for PIM neighbors. R2(config)#ip access-list standard PIM_NEIGHBORS R2(config-std-nacl)#permit 10.1.2.6 R2(config-std-nacl)#exit Step 2: Apply the ACL to all interfaces enabled for PIM. R2(config)#int g1/1 R2(config-if)#ip pim neighbor-filter PIM_NEIGHBORS

Check Content

This requirement is not applicable for the DODIN Backbone. Step 1: Verify all interfaces enabled for PIM have a neighbor ACL bound to the interface as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet1/1 ip address 10.1.2.2 255.255.255.0 ip pim neighbor-filter PIM_NEIGHBORS ip pim sparse-mode Step 2: Review the configured ACL for filtering PIM neighbors as shown in the example below: ip access-list standard PIM_NEIGHBORS permit 10.1.2.6 If PIM neighbor ACLs are not bound to all interfaces that have PIM enabled, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast edge router must be configured to establish boundaries for administratively scoped multicast traffic.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000810
Rule ID
SV-106149r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000005
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

If multicast traffic is forwarded beyond the intended boundary, it is possible that it can be intercepted by unauthorized or unintended personnel. Administrative scoped multicast addresses are locally assigned and are to be used exclusively by the enterprise network or enclave. Administrative scoped multicast traffic must not cross the enclave perimeter in either direction. Restricting multicast traffic makes it more difficult for a malicious user to access sensitive traffic. Admin-Local scope is encouraged for any multicast traffic within a network intended for network management, as well as for control plane traffic that must reach beyond link-local destinations.

Fix Text

Step 1: Configure the ACL to deny packets with multicast administratively scoped destination addresses as shown in the example below: R2(config)#ip access-list standard MULTICAST_SCOPE R2(config-std-nacl)#deny 239.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 R2(config-std-nacl)#permit any R2(config-std-nacl)#exit Step 2: Apply the multicast boundary at the appropriate interfaces as shown in the example below: R2(config)#int g1/2 R2(config-if)#ip multicast boundary MULTICAST_SCOPE R2(config-if)#end

Check Content

Review the router configuration and verify that admin-scope multicast traffic is blocked at the external edge as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet1/2 ip address x.1.12.2 255.255.255.252 ip pim sparse-mode ip multicast boundary MULTICAST_SCOPE … … … ip access-list standard MULTICAST_SCOPE deny 239.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 permit any If the router is not configured to establish boundaries for administratively scoped multicast traffic, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast Rendezvous Point (RP) router must be configured to limit the multicast forwarding cache so that its resources are not saturated by managing an overwhelming number of Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) and Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) source-active entries.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000820
Rule ID
SV-106151r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000120
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

MSDP peering between networks enables sharing of multicast source information. Enclaves with an existing multicast topology using PIM-SM can configure their RP routers to peer with MSDP routers. As a first step of defense against a denial of service (DoS) attack, all RP routers must limit the multicast forwarding cache to ensure that router resources are not saturated managing an overwhelming number of PIM and MSDP source-active entries.

Fix Text

The risk associated with this requirement can be fully mitigated by configuring the router to filter PIM register messages, rate limiting the number of PIM register messages, and accept MSDP packets only from known MSDP peers. Step 1: Configure the router to filter PIM register messages received from a multicast DR for any undesirable multicast groups and sources. The example below will deny any multicast streams for groups 239.5.0.0/16 and allow from only sources 10.1.2.6 and 10.1.2.7. R2(config)#ip access-list extended PIM_REGISTER_FILTER R2(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any 239.5.0.0 0.0.255.255 R2(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip host 10.1.2.6 any R2(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip host 10.1.2.7 any R2(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any R2(config-ext-nacl)#exit R2(config)#ip pim accept-register list PIM_REGISTER_FILTER R2(config)#end Step 2: Configure the RP to rate limit the number of multicast register messages. R2(config)#ip pim register-rate-limit nn Step 3: Configure the receive path or interface ACLs to only accept MSDP packets from known MSDP peers. R8(config)#ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any established R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.1.28.2 host x.1.28.8 eq 639 R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny tcp any host x1.28.8 eq 639 R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.1.28.2 host x.1.28.8 eq bgp R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.1.28.2 eq bgp host x.1.28.8 R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit pim host x.1.28.2 host x.1.28.8 … … … R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any

Check Content

The Cisco router does not have a mechanism to limit the multicast forwarding cache. However, the risk associated with this requirement can be fully mitigated by configuring the router to: 1. Filter PIM register messages. 2. Rate limiting the number of PIM register messages. 3. Accept MSDP packets only from known MSDP peers. Step 1: Verify that the RP router is configured to filter PIM register messages for any undesirable multicast groups and sources. The example below will deny any multicast streams for groups 239.5.0.0/16 and allow from only sources 10.1.2.6 and 10.1.2.7. ip pim rp-address 10.1.12.3 ip pim accept-register list PIM_REGISTER_FILTER … … … ip access-list extended PIM_REGISTER_FILTER deny ip any 239.5.0.0 0.0.255.255 permit ip host 10.1.2.6 any permit ip host 10.1.2.7 any deny ip any any Step 2: Verify that the router is configured to rate limiting the number of PIM register messages as shown in the example below. ip pim rp-address 10.2.2.2 ip pim register-rate-limit nn Step 3: Review the router configuration to determine if there is a receive path or interface filter to only accept MSDP packets from known MSDP peers as shown in the example below. Step 3a: Verify that interfaces used for MSDP peering have an inbound ACL as shown in the example. interface GigabitEthernet1/1 ip address x.1.28.8 255.255.255.0 ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND in ip pim sparse-mode Step 3b: Verify that the ACL restricts MSDP peering to only known sources. ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND permit tcp any any established permit tcp host x.1.28.2 host x.1.28.8 eq 639 deny tcp any host x.1.28.8 eq 639 log permit tcp host x.1.28.2 host 10.1.28.8 eq bgp permit tcp host x.1.28.2 eq bgp host x.1.28.8 permit pim host x.1.28.2 pim host x.1.28.8 … … … deny ip any any log Note: MSDP connections is via TCP port 639 If the RP router is not configured to filter PIM register messages, rate limiting the number of PIM register messages, and accept MSDP packets only from known MSDP peers, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast Rendezvous Point (RP) router must be configured to filter Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) Register messages received from the Designated Router (DR) for any undesirable multicast groups and sources.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000830
Rule ID
SV-106153r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000013
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Real-time multicast traffic can entail multiple large flows of data. An attacker can flood a network segment with multicast packets, over-using the available bandwidth and thereby creating a denial of service (DoS) condition. Hence, it is imperative that register messages are accepted only for authorized multicast groups and sources.

Fix Text

Configure the router to filter PIM register messages received from a multicast DR for any undesirable multicast groups and sources. The example below will deny any multicast streams for groups 239.5.0.0/16 and allow from only sources 10.1.2.6 and 10.1.2.7. R2(config)#ip access-list extended PIM_REGISTER_FILTER R2(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any 239.5.0.0 0.0.255.255 R2(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip host 10.1.2.6 any R2(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip host 10.1.2.7 any R2(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any R2(config-ext-nacl)#exit R2(config)#ip pim accept-register list PIM_REGISTER_FILTER R2(config)#end

Check Content

Verify that the RP router is configured to filter PIM register messages. The example below will deny any multicast streams for groups 239.5.0.0/16 and allow from only sources 10.1.2.6 and 10.1.2.7. ip pim rp-address 10.1.12.3 ip pim accept-register list PIM_REGISTER_FILTER … … … ip access-list extended PIM_REGISTER_FILTER deny ip any 239.5.0.0 0.0.255.255 permit ip host 10.1.2.6 any permit ip host 10.1.2.7 any deny ip any any If the RP router peering with PIM-SM routers is not configured with a policy to block registration messages for any undesirable multicast groups and sources, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast Rendezvous Point (RP) router must be configured to filter Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) Join messages received from the Designated Router (DR) for any undesirable multicast groups.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000840
Rule ID
SV-106155r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000019-RTR-000014
CCI
CCI-001414
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Real-time multicast traffic can entail multiple large flows of data. An attacker can flood a network segment with multicast packets, over-using the available bandwidth and thereby creating a denial of service (DoS) condition. Hence, it is imperative that join messages are only accepted for authorized multicast groups.

Fix Text

Configure the RP to filter PIM join messages for any undesirable multicast groups as shown in the example below: R2(config)#ip access-list standard PIM_JOIN_FILTER R2(config-std-nacl)#deny 239.8.0.0 0.0.255.255 R2(config-std-nacl)#permit any R2(config-std-nacl)#exit R2(config)#ip pim accept-rp 10.2.2.2 PIM_JOIN_FILTER R2(config)#end

Check Content

Verify that the RP router is configured to filter PIM join messages for any undesirable multicast groups. In the example below, groups from 239.8.0.0/16 are not allowed. ip pim rp-address 10.2.2.2 ip pim accept-rp 10.2.2.2 FILTER_PIM_JOINS … … … ip access-list standard FILTER_PIM_JOINS deny 239.8.0.0 0.0.255.255 permit any ! If the RP is not configured to filter join messages received from the DR for any undesirable multicast groups, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast Rendezvous Point (RP) must be configured to rate limit the number of Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) Register messages.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000850
Rule ID
SV-106157r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000121
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

When a new source starts transmitting in a PIM Sparse Mode network, the DR will encapsulate the multicast packets into register messages and forward them to the RP using unicast. This process can be taxing on the CPU for both the DR and the RP if the source is running at a high data rate and there are many new sources starting at the same time. This scenario can potentially occur immediately after a network failover. The rate limit for the number of register messages should be set to a relatively low value based on the known number of multicast sources within the multicast domain.

Fix Text

Configure the RP to rate limit the number of multicast register messages. R2(config)#ip pim register-rate-limit nn

Check Content

Review the configuration of the RP to verify that it is rate limiting the number of PIM register messages. ip pim rp-address 10.2.2.2 ip pim register-rate-limit nn If the RP is not limiting PIM register messages, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast Designated Router (DR) must be configured to filter the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) and Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) Report messages to allow hosts to join only multicast groups that have been approved by the organization.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000860
Rule ID
SV-106159r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000364-RTR-000114
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Real-time multicast traffic can entail multiple large flows of data. Large unicast flows tend to be fairly isolated (i.e., someone doing a file download here or there), whereas multicast can have broader impact on bandwidth consumption, resulting in extreme network congestion. Hence, it is imperative that there is multicast admission control to restrict which multicast groups hosts are allowed to join via IGMP or MLD.

Fix Text

Configure the DR to filter the IGMP or MLD Membership Report messages to allow hosts to join only those multicast groups that have been approved. Step 1: Configure the ACL to filter IGMP Membership Report messages as shown in the example. R3(config)#ip access-list standard IGMP_JOIN_FILTER R3(config-std-nacl)#deny 239.8.0.0 0.0.255.255 R3(config-std-nacl)#permit any R3(config-std-nacl)#exit Step 2: Apply the filter to all host facing interfaces. R3(config)#int g0/0 R3(config-if)#ip igmp access-group IGMP_JOIN_FILTER

Check Content

Review the configuration of the DR to verify that it is filtering IGMP or MLD Membership Report messages, allowing hosts to join only those groups that have been approved. Step 1: Verify that all host facing interfaces are configured to filter IGMP Membership Report messages (IGMP joins) as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/0 ip address 10.3.3.3 255.255.255.0 ip pim sparse-mode ip igmp access-group IGMP_JOIN_FILTER ip igmp version 3 Step 2: Verify that the ACL denies unauthorized groups or permits only authorized groups. The example below denies all groups from 239.8.0.0/16 range. ip access-list standard IGMP_JOIN_FILTER deny 239.8.0.0 0.0.255.255 permit any Note: This requirement is only applicable to Source Specific Multicast (SSM) implementation. This requirement is not applicable to Any Source Multicast (ASM) since the filtering is being performed by the Rendezvous Point router. If the DR is not filtering IGMP or MLD Membership Report messages, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast Designated Router (DR) must be configured to filter the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) and Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) Report messages to allow hosts to join a multicast group only from sources that have been approved by the organization.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000870
Rule ID
SV-106161r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000364-RTR-000115
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Real-time multicast traffic can entail multiple large flows of data. Large unicast flows tend to be fairly isolated (i.e., someone doing a file download here or there), whereas multicast can have broader impact on bandwidth consumption, resulting in extreme network congestion. Hence, it is imperative that there is multicast admission control to restrict which multicast groups hosts are allowed to join via IGMP or MLD.

Fix Text

Configure the DR to filter the IGMP and MLD report messages to allow hosts to join only those multicast groups from sources that have been approved as shown in the example. R3(config)#ip access-list extended IGMP_JOIN_FILTER R3(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any 232.8.0.0 0.0.255.255 R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip x.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any R3(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any R3(config-ext-nacl)#exit Step 2: Apply the filter to all host facing interfaces. R3(config)#int g0/0 R3(config-if)#ip igmp access-group IGMP_JOIN_FILTER

Check Content

Review the configuration of the DR to verify that it is filtering IGMP or MLD report messages, allowing hosts to only join multicast groups from sources that have been approved. Step 1: Verify that all host-facing interfaces are configured to filter IGMP Membership Report messages (IGMP joins) as shown in the example below: interface GigabitEthernet0/0 ip address 10.3.3.3 255.255.255.0 ip pim sparse-mode ip igmp access-group IGMP_JOIN_FILTER ip igmp version 3 Step 2: Verify that the ACL denies unauthorized sources or allows only authorized sources. The example below denies all groups from 232.8.0.0/16 range and permits sources only from the x.0.0.0/8 network. ip access-list extended IGMP_JOIN_FILTER deny ip any 232.8.0.0 0.0.255.255 permit ip x.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any deny ip any any Note: This requirement is only applicable to Source Specific Multicast (SSM) implementation. If the DR is not filtering IGMP or MLD report messages, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast Designated Router (DR) must be configured to limit the number of mroute states resulting from Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) and Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) Host Membership Reports.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000880
Rule ID
SV-106163r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000122
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The current multicast paradigm can let any host join any multicast group at any time by sending an IGMP or MLD membership report to the DR. In a Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) Sparse Mode network, the DR will send a PIM Join message for the group to the RP. Without any form of admission control, this can pose a security risk to the entire multicast domain, specifically the multicast routers along the shared tree from the DR to the RP that must maintain the mroute state information for each group join request. Hence, it is imperative that the DR is configured to limit the number of mroute state information that must be maintained to mitigate the risk of IGMP or MLD flooding.

Fix Text

Configure the DR on a global or interface basis to limit the number of mroute states resulting from IGMP or MLD membership reports. R3(config)#int g0/0 R3(config-if)#ip igmp limit 2

Check Content

Review the DR configuration to verify that it is limiting the number of mroute states via IGMP or MLD. Verify IGMP limits have been configured globally or on each host-facing interface via the ip igmp limit command as shown in the example. interface GigabitEthernet0/0 ip address 10.3.3.3 255.255.255.0 … … … ip igmp limit nn If the DR is not limiting multicast join requests via IGMP or MLD on a global or interfaces basis, this is a finding.

The Cisco multicast Designated Router (DR) must be configured to set the shortest-path tree (SPT) threshold to infinity to minimalize source-group (S, G) state within the multicast topology where Any Source Multicast (ASM) is deployed.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000890
Rule ID
SV-106165r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000362-RTR-000123
CCI
CCI-002385
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

ASM can have many sources for the same groups (many-to-many). For many receivers, the path via the RP may not be ideal compared with the shortest path from the source to the receiver. By default, the last-hop router will initiate a switch from the shared tree to a source-specific SPT to obtain lower latencies. This is accomplished by the last-hop router sending an (S, G) Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) Join toward S (the source). When the last-hop router begins to receive traffic for the group from the source via the SPT, it will send a PIM Prune message to the RP for the (S, G). The RP will then send a Prune message toward the source. The SPT switchover becomes a scaling issue for large multicast topologies that have many receivers and many sources for many groups because (S, G) entries require more memory than (*, G). Hence, it is imperative to minimize the amount of (S, G) state to be maintained by increasing the threshold that determines when the SPT switchover occurs.

Fix Text

Configure the DR to increase the SPT threshold or set it to infinity to minimalize (S, G) state within the multicast topology where ASM is deployed. R3(config)#ip pim spt-threshold infinity

Check Content

Review the DR configuration to verify that the SPT switchover threshold is increased (default is "0") or set to infinity (never switch over). ip pim rp-address 10.2.2.2 ip pim spt-threshold infinity If the DR is not configured to increase the SPT threshold or set to infinity to minimalize (S, G) state, this is a finding.

The Cisco Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) router must be configured to only accept MSDP packets from known MSDP peers.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000900
Rule ID
SV-106167r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000364-RTR-000116
CCI
CCI-002403
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

MSDP peering with customer network routers presents additional risks to the DISN Core, whether from a rogue or misconfigured MSDP-enabled router. To guard against an attack from malicious MSDP traffic, the receive path or interface filter for all MSDP-enabled RP routers must be configured to only accept MSDP packets from known MSDP peers.

Fix Text

Configure the receive path or interface ACLs to only accept MSDP packets from known MSDP peers. R8(config)#ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any established R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.1.28.2 host x.1.28.8 eq 639 R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny tcp any host x1.28.8 eq 639 R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.1.28.2 host x.1.28.8 eq bgp R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host x.1.28.2 eq bgp host x.1.28.8 R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit pim host x.1.28.2 host x.1.28.8 … … … R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if there is a receive path or interface filter to only accept MSDP packets from known MSDP peers. Step 1: Verify that interfaces used for MSDP peering have an inbound ACL as shown in the example. interface GigabitEthernet1/1 ip address x.1.28.8 255.255.255.0 ip access-group EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND in ip pim sparse-mode Step 2: Verify that the ACL restricts MSDP peering to only known sources. ip access-list extended EXTERNAL_ACL_INBOUND permit tcp any any established permit tcp host x.1.28.2 host x.1.28.8 eq 639 deny tcp any host x.1.28.8 eq 639 log permit tcp host x.1.28.2 host 10.1.28.8 eq bgp permit tcp host x.1.28.2 eq bgp host x.1.28.8 permit pim host x.1.28.2 pim host x.1.28.8 … … … deny ip any any log Note: MSDP connections is via TCP port 639. If the router is not configured to only accept MSDP packets from known MSDP peers, this is a finding.

The Cisco Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) router must be configured to authenticate all received MSDP packets.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000910
Rule ID
SV-106169r1_rule
Severity
Cat II
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000343-RTR-000002
CCI
CCI-001958
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

MSDP peering with customer network routers presents additional risks to the core, whether from a rogue or misconfigured MSDP-enabled router. MSDP password authentication is used to validate each segment sent on the TCP connection between MSDP peers, protecting the MSDP session against the threat of spoofed packets being injected into the TCP connection stream.

Fix Text

Configure the router to authenticate MSDP messages as shown in the following example: R2(config)#ip msdp password peer x.1.28.8 xxxxxxxxxxxx

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if received MSDP packets are authenticated. ip msdp peer x.1.28.8 remote-as 8 ip msdp password peer x.1.28.8 xxxxxxxxxxxx If the router does not require MSDP authentication, this is a finding.

The Cisco Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) router must be configured to filter received source-active multicast advertisements for any undesirable multicast groups and sources.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000920
Rule ID
SV-106171r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000018-RTR-000007
CCI
CCI-001368
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The interoperability of BGP extensions for interdomain multicast routing and MSDP enables seamless connectivity of multicast domains between autonomous systems. MP-BGP advertises the unicast prefixes of the multicast sources used by Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) routers to perform RPF checks and build multicast distribution trees. MSDP is a mechanism used to connect multiple PIM sparse-mode domains, allowing RPs from different domains to share information about active sources. When RPs in peering multicast domains hear about active sources, they can pass on that information to their local receivers, thereby allowing multicast data to be forwarded between the domains. Configuring an import policy to block multicast advertisements for reserved, Martian, single-source multicast, and any other undesirable multicast groups, as well as any source-group (S, G) states with Bogon source addresses, would assist in avoiding unwanted multicast traffic from traversing the core.

Fix Text

Configure the MSDP router to filter received source-active multicast advertisements for any undesirable multicast groups and sources as shown in the example below: R8(config)#ip access-list extended INBOUND_MSDP_SA_FILTER R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 224.0.1.3 ! Rwhod R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 224.0.1.24 ! Microsoft-ds R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 224.0.1.22 ! SVRLOC R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 224.0.1.2 ! SGI-Dogfight R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 224.0.1.35 ! SVRLOC-DA R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 224.0.1.60 ! hp-device-disc R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 224.0.1.39 ! Auto-RP R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any host 224.0.1.40 ! Auto-RP R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any 232.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 ! SSM range R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any 239.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 ! Admin scoped range R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any ! RFC 1918 address range R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 127.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any ! RFC 1918 address range R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 172.16.0.0 0.15.255.255 any ! RFC 1918 address range R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 192.168.0.0 0.0.255.255 any ! RFC 1918 address range R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any any R8(config-ext-nacl)#exit R8(config)#ip msdp sa-filter in x.1.28.2 list INBOUND_MSDP_SA_FILTER

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if there is import policy to block source-active multicast advertisements for any undesirable multicast groups, as well as any (S, G) states with undesirable source addresses. Step 1: Verify that an inbound source-active filter is bound to each MSDP peer. ip msdp peer x.1.28.2 remote-as 2 ip msdp sa-filter in x.1.28.2 list INBOUND_MSDP_SA_FILTER Step 2: Review the access lists referenced by the source-active filter to verify that undesirable multicast groups, auto-RP, single source multicast (SSM) groups, and advertisements from undesirable sources are blocked. ip access-list extended INBOUND_MSDP_SA_FILTER deny ip any host 224.0.1.3 deny ip any host 224.0.1.24 deny ip any host 224.0.1.22 deny ip any host 224.0.1.2 deny ip any host 224.0.1.35 deny ip any host 224.0.1.60 deny ip any host 224.0.1.39 deny ip any host 224.0.1.40 deny ip any 232.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 deny ip any 239.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 deny ip 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any deny ip 127.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any deny ip 172.16.0.0 0.15.255.255 any deny ip 192.168.0.0 0.0.255.255 any permit ip any any If the router is not configured with an import policy to filter undesirable SA multicast advertisements, this is a finding.

The Cisco Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) router must be configured to filter source-active multicast advertisements to external MSDP peers to avoid global visibility of local-only multicast sources and groups.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000930
Rule ID
SV-106173r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000018-RTR-000008
CCI
CCI-001368
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

To avoid global visibility of local information, there are a number of source-group (S, G) states in a PIM-SM domain that must not be leaked to another domain, such as multicast sources with private address, administratively scoped multicast addresses, and the auto-RP groups (224.0.1.39 and 224.0.1.40). Allowing a multicast distribution tree, local to the core, to extend beyond its boundary could enable local multicast traffic to leak into other autonomous systems and customer networks.

Fix Text

Configure the router with an export policy avoid global visibility of local multicast (S, G) states. The example below will prevent exporting multicast active sources belonging to the private network. R8(config)#ip access-list extended OUTBOUND_MSDP_SA_FILTER R8(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any R8(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any any R8(config-ext-nacl)#exit R8(config)#ip msdp sa-filter in x.1.28.2 list OUTBOUND_MSDP_SA_FILTER

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if there is export policy to block local source-active multicast advertisements. Step 1: Verify that an outbound source-active filter is bound to each MSDP peer as shown in the example below: ip msdp peer 10.1.28.8 remote-as 8 ip msdp sa-filter out 10.1.28.8 list OUTBOUND_MSDP_SA_FILTER Step 2: Review the access lists referenced by the source-active filters and verify that MSDP source-active messages being sent to MSDP peers do not leak advertisements that are local. ip access-list extended OUTBOUND_MSDP_SA_FILTER deny ip 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any permit ip any any If the router is not configured with an export policy to filter local source-active multicast advertisements, this is a finding.

The Cisco Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) router must be configured to limit the amount of source-active messages it accepts on a per-peer basis.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000940
Rule ID
SV-106175r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000018-RTR-000009
CCI
CCI-001368
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

To reduce any risk of a denial of service (DoS) attack from a rogue or misconfigured MSDP router, the router must be configured to limit the number of source-active messages it accepts from each peer.

Fix Text

Configure the router to limit the amount of source-active messages it accepts from each peer. R8(config)#ip msdp sa-limit x.1.28.2 nnn

Check Content

Review the router configuration to determine if it is configured to limit the amount of source-active messages it accepts on a per-peer basis. ip msdp peer x.1.28.2 remote-as nn ip msdp sa-filter in 10.1.28.2 list MSDP_SA_FILTER ip msdp sa-limit X.1.28.2 nnn If the router is not configured to limit the source-active messages it accepts, this is a finding.

The Cisco Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) router must be configured to use a loopback address as the source address when originating MSDP traffic.

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000950
Rule ID
SV-106177r1_rule
Severity
Cat III
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000011
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

Using a loopback address as the source address offers a multitude of uses for security, access, management, and scalability of MSDP routers. It is easier to construct appropriate ingress filters for router management plane traffic destined to the network management subnet since the source addresses will be from the range used for loopback interfaces instead of a larger range of addresses used for physical interfaces. Log information recorded by authentication and syslog servers will record the router’s loopback address instead of the numerous physical interface addresses.

Fix Text

Configure the router to use its loopback address is used as the source address when sending MSDP packets. R2(config)#ip msdp peer x.44.2.34 connect-source lo12 remote-as nn

Check Content

Verify that the loopback interface is used as the source address for all MSDP packets generated by the router. ip msdp peer x.44.2.34 connect-source Loopback12 remote-as nn If the router does not use its loopback address as the source address when originating MSDP traffic, this is a finding.

The Cisco PE router must be configured to have each Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) instance with the appropriate Route Target (RT).

Finding ID
CISC-RT-000640
Rule ID
SV-106249r1_rule
Severity
Cat I
CCE
(None)
Group Title
SRG-NET-000512-RTR-000006
CCI
CCI-000366
Target Key
(None)
Documentable
No
Discussion

The primary security model for an MPLS L3VPN as well as a VRF-lite infrastructure is traffic separation. Each interface can only be associated to one VRF, which is the fundamental framework for traffic separation. Forwarding decisions are made based on the routing table belonging to the VRF. Control of what routes are imported into or exported from a VRF is based on the RT. It is critical that traffic does not leak from one COI tenant or L3VPN to another; hence, it is imperative that the correct RT is configured for each VRF.

Fix Text

Configure the router to have each VRF instance defined with the correct RT. R5(config)#ip vrf CUST1 R5(config-vrf)#route-target import 13:13 R5(config-vrf)#route-target export 13:13 R5(config-vrf)#end

Check Content

Review the design plan for MPLS/L3VPN and VRF-lite to determine what RTs have been assigned for each VRF. Review the router configuration and verify that the correct RT is configured for each VRF. In the example below, route target 13:13 has been configured for customer 1. ip vrf CUST1 rd 13:13 route-target export 13:13 route-target import 13:13 If there are VRFs configured with the wrong RT, this is a finding.